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MAYOR

DOWNLOAD FULL QUESTIONNAIRE:

Latoya Cantrell

Troy Henry

Desiree Charbonnet

Johnese Smith

Matthew Hill

Tommie Vassel

 

ANSWERS BY QUESTION

Cantrell: For me, the term would apply to those that help define, embody and exemplify culture while bringing it to others. That can happen through music, visual arts, dress,dance, food, writing and possibly other forms including architecture and craftsmanship. Determining hard fast criteria for culture bearers, especially New Orleans culture bearers, is going to be subjective and invite great, full-throated debate. In other words, when you try to define what is and what isn’t culture--and we see and hear these discussions in our restaurants, coffee shops, bars and now in social media channels--count on an argument. And it’s a fight worth having, but I think true leadership is about bringing people together, listening and building consensus. So I would prefer to create an atmosphere that can facilitate that, and to focus on preserving and celebrating our culture.   Henry: Everyone in New Orleans with any kind of roots here – and who is willing to share them and pass them on to the next generations – is a Culture Bearer. We are blessed with multiple cultures in the Crescent City, and I don’t want to exclude anyone.   Charbonnet: A culture bearer is a person steeped in a craft with a tradition, but who brings that tradition forward creatively. Culture bearers are important to New Orleans because they represent the very fabric of our city.   Smith: I have never heard of this term before. This terminology may have emerged after Katrina. It has no place in this musical culture.   Hill: A Cultural Bearer is an ambassador of arts, music, culture, or spoken word of a set of traditions or in the process of continuing or building future traditions within a community. I also believe that festivals and events are included in cultural bearing. Super Sunday is a prime example of Cultural Bearing on an event scale. Culture evolves and so does the way culture expresses itself and it is up to the bearers to bring it to the public or interested parties. These bearers are very diverse and when it comes to public policy City Government needs to know exactly who and what cultural bearers are. Anyone who performs in public or on stage is a cultural bearer. They can range from the Break Dancing Trio, to the guy in the Monster Suit, Tarot Card readers, the Violin Playing Werewolf, Mimes, Jugglers, etc. Artists include dancers as well as painters, sketch artist, cartoonists, digital artists, light show performers, and artists using different mediums. Music includes any kind of street musician with instruments or acappella. The children with the 5 gallon bucket drum set is still a street performer and is an example of an evolving tradition that may very well be seen 100 years from now. Spoken word is not the most popular street performance in New Orleans but it should still be considered within the realm of cultural bearing. I would consider Tarot Card Readers to be performing spoken word. As Mayor, I will defend every part of our culture and those who bear that culture. I have been a victim of the city’s war on culture, and I will not allow it to continue under my administration. We have sold our culture all over the world to increase tourism, yet the city continues to treat our cultural bearers as a commodity. Culture is not a commodity. As Mayor, I will realign our priorities to cultivate our culture not tax, fee, or regulate it out of existence.   Vassel: Culture Bearer in my opinion speaks of one that possesses the experience, longevity and knowledge of a particular culture.

Cantrell: For me, the term would apply to those that help define, embody and exemplify culture while bringing it to others. That can happen through music, visual arts, dress,dance, food, writing and possibly other forms including architecture and craftsmanship.

Determining hard fast criteria for culture bearers, especially New Orleans culture bearers, is going to be subjective and invite great, full-throated debate. In other words, when you try to define what is and what isn’t culture--and we see and hear these discussions in our restaurants, coffee shops, bars and now in social media channels--count on an argument. And it’s a fight worth having, but I think true leadership is about bringing people together, listening and building consensus. So I would prefer to create an atmosphere that can facilitate that, and to focus on preserving and celebrating our culture.

 

Henry: Everyone in New Orleans with any kind of roots here – and who is willing to share them and pass them on to the next generations – is a Culture Bearer. We are blessed with multiple cultures in the Crescent City, and I don’t want to exclude anyone.

 

Charbonnet: A culture bearer is a person steeped in a craft with a tradition, but who brings that tradition forward creatively. Culture bearers are important to New Orleans because they represent the very fabric of our city.

 

Smith: I have never heard of this term before. This terminology may have emerged after Katrina. It has no place in this musical culture.

 

Hill: A Cultural Bearer is an ambassador of arts, music, culture, or spoken word of a set of traditions or in the process of continuing or building future traditions within a community. I also believe that festivals and events are included in cultural bearing. Super Sunday is a prime example of Cultural Bearing on an event scale. Culture evolves and so does the way culture expresses itself and it is up to the bearers to bring it to the public or interested parties. These bearers are very diverse and when it comes to public policy City Government needs to know exactly who and what cultural bearers are.

Anyone who performs in public or on stage is a cultural bearer. They can range from the Break Dancing Trio, to the guy in the Monster Suit, Tarot Card readers, the Violin Playing Werewolf, Mimes, Jugglers, etc.

Artists include dancers as well as painters, sketch artist, cartoonists, digital artists, light show performers, and artists using different mediums.

Music includes any kind of street musician with instruments or acappella. The children with the 5 gallon bucket drum set is still a street performer and is an example of an evolving tradition that may very well be seen 100 years from now.

Spoken word is not the most popular street performance in New Orleans but it should still be considered within the realm of cultural bearing. I would consider Tarot Card Readers to be performing spoken word.

As Mayor, I will defend every part of our culture and those who bear that culture. I have been a victim of the city’s war on culture, and I will not allow it to continue under my administration. We have sold our culture all over the world to increase tourism, yet the city continues to treat our cultural bearers as a commodity. Culture is not a commodity. As Mayor, I will realign our priorities to cultivate our culture not tax, fee, or regulate it out of existence.

 

Vassel: Culture Bearer in my opinion speaks of one that possesses the experience, longevity and knowledge of a particular culture.

Cantrell: As a New Orleans Councilwoman, I have prioritized creating affordable housing by creating the density bonus , redirecting the Neighborhood Improvement Fund to homeowners and neighbors instead of code enforcement attorneys, working with housing advocates and getting state funding for case management services for homeowners stuck in Road Home. It’s not enough because our people continue to be priced out and forced to leave neighborhoods that their families have called home for generations. As mayor, I will do the following: POLICY DETAILS Use all the tools in the toolbox , including many of those proposed in the local Put Housing First Platform. EMPOWER NEIGHBORHOODS “Provide affordable housing options for local citizens”                   ●  Focus on preservation of existing affordable housing stock..                   ●  Offer incentives for landlords to moderate rent.                   ●  Encourage new housing in keeping with the character and affordability of our neighborhoods.                   ●  Transfer remaining Road Home properties to new homeowners / Incentives for local citizens.                   ●  Encourage employers to provide down payment assistance for their employees                   ●  Reform the lien process and provide property tax relief to struggling families.                   ●  Help families own homes and build wealth / First-time owner tax abatement program.                   ●  Prioritize vacant property development and increase access to capital for development.                   ●  In terms of STRs, bring neighborhoods into the discussion, examine new requirements and tighten enforcement.                   ●  Work with legislature on a constitutional amendment allowing the city more flexibility/oversight over property tax policy. Use this to incentivize affordable housing. (GNOHA questionnaire)                   ●  Incentivize energy efficiency projects for the landlord community, to help lower energy bills, while also creating more green jobs in our community (GNOHA)                   ●  Build affordable units: Gap financing program for developers leveraging other state and federal incentives (eg Historic Tax Credits, 4% Low Income Housing Tax Credits)   Henry: My strategy is built on the objective of enabling more locals to own their own homes. Home ownership in New Orleans has declined from the time before Katrina, and City funds should be directed towards bringing this number up. For instance, subsidies that are available for the construction of affordable housing units in larger developments should be made available to help people of modest means into “Rent-to- Own” programs. Loan subsidies can be forgiven over time as the owner stays in the house.   Charbonnet: As Mayor, my administration would emphasize facilitating musicians housing. The development of affordable housing in New Orleans, especially for our working people, has not kept pace with the growing demand. My administration will approach this problem aggressively by prioritizing the development of safe, healthy and affordable rental units and homeownership near jobs and essential public services. We are losing our natural musicians village with fewer and fewer musicians living in Treme, the birthplace of Jazz. It is apparent that this city is in an affordable housing crisis, this crisis hits our cultural economy the hardest. I have put together a detailed plan to address the affordability crisis and made it public for everyone to view. Please visit DesireeCharbonnet.com and send me your thoughts and ideas.   Smith: I have responded to questionnaires concerning these exact issues with other organizations who were to protect the citizens of New Orleans from such invasive and determined actions from those who clearly knows that this is happening to these neighborhoods. The other concern I have is that these new (culture wipeouts) are not able to afford these homes once this gentrification of African American neighborhoods are complete. They have high turnover of homeownerships; usually most of these homes have been owned by at least four homeowners within the last five years! Where is the stability after these homeowners move out these long-standing African American families that made those neighborhoods what they were? Finally, after a high turnover of homeowners, then it becomes a short-term rental, so that the African Americans who once stayed in those neighborhoods are not able to afford them nor return.   Hill: The root cause of gentrification is over-speculation. This speculation drives up housing prices as well as the cost of living. The reason why the over-speculation is occurring in neighborhoods such as Central City, Treme, and the 7th Ward is this city’s policy of growth. Development Districts and revitalization projects are the destroying neighborhoods by creating a false demand or fake gold-rush for property. Because the city is trying to grow, it opened the floodgate rather than turn on the faucet. There has been too much investment too quickly which has made investors overpay in an overinflated market, and thus drive up the price and cost. The property is not worth what people are paying for it, the quality of renovations does not match the price, and then the mortgages are too high. The city Assessor then comes along and over-values properties thus inflating the housing bubble more and adversely affecting the cost of living. Because we have a weak economy, we do not have the kind of jobs that provide incomes high enough to afford these neighborhoods. People on fixed incomes are at the most risk because their assessments, cost of living, and taxes have the ability to push them out. We need to stop over-saturating the market west of the Industrial Canal. We are building too much too fast, and it is causing speculation to overinflate the prices of homes in Orleans Parish. This is only exacerbated by the shotty work, overbilling, and a shrinking population. I will delay recovery districts and spread out their project lifetime to curb the over-speculation that is ruining neighborhoods across the city. I will focus on growth in New Orleans East, the gateway to New Orleans. We are going to use a concept called Urban Centers to deal with affordable housing, busing, jobs, childcare, economic growth, and parking. Urban Centers are primarily used in Suburban areas and are designed to mimic a busy city block. It is usually a 1sq mile plot of land with at least one high-rise mixed-used zoning building that houses residential, retail, and commercial uses. The area surrounding the high-rise consist of a grocery store, entertainment, restaurants, outdoor plaza, parking, bus depot, shopping, green-space, government services, and apartments. Urban Centers are designed to preserve low-income housing while providing jobs and easy access to transportation and education. With smarter policies, we can deflate the housing bubble and reduce the cost of living. I assure you that I will bring down property taxes so that our elderly and fixed income citizens are insulated from future over-speculation. We are smarter than the problems that face us.   Vassel: I was born and raised in Treme and currently live on the same block that I was born on.  I was a member of Providence Housing which redeveloped the Lafitte Housing.  I am going to use all of the remaining properties that NORA owns and use those properties for affordable housing.

Cantrell: As a New Orleans Councilwoman, I have prioritized creating affordable housing by creating the density bonus , redirecting the Neighborhood Improvement Fund to homeowners and neighbors instead of code enforcement attorneys, working with housing advocates and getting state funding for case management services for homeowners stuck in Road Home.

It’s not enough because our people continue to be priced out and forced to leave neighborhoods that their families have called home for generations. As mayor, I will do the following:

POLICY DETAILS

Use all the tools in the toolbox , including many of those proposed in the local Put Housing First Platform.

EMPOWER NEIGHBORHOODS

“Provide affordable housing options for local citizens”

                  ●  Focus on preservation of existing affordable housing stock..

                  ●  Offer incentives for landlords to moderate rent.

                  ●  Encourage new housing in keeping with the character and affordability of our neighborhoods.

                  ●  Transfer remaining Road Home properties to new homeowners / Incentives for local citizens.

                  ●  Encourage employers to provide down payment assistance for their employees

                  ●  Reform the lien process and provide property tax relief to struggling families.

                  ●  Help families own homes and build wealth / First-time owner tax abatement program.

                  ●  Prioritize vacant property development and increase access to capital for development.

                  ●  In terms of STRs, bring neighborhoods into the discussion, examine new requirements and tighten enforcement.

                  ●  Work with legislature on a constitutional amendment allowing the city more flexibility/oversight over property tax policy. Use this to incentivize affordable housing. (GNOHA questionnaire)

                  ●  Incentivize energy efficiency projects for the landlord community, to help lower energy bills, while also creating more green jobs in our community (GNOHA)

                  ●  Build affordable units: Gap financing program for developers leveraging other state and federal incentives (eg Historic Tax Credits, 4% Low Income Housing Tax Credits)

 

Henry: My strategy is built on the objective of enabling more locals to own their own homes. Home ownership in New Orleans has declined from the time before Katrina, and City funds should be directed towards bringing this number up. For instance, subsidies that are available for the construction of affordable housing units in larger developments should be made available to help people of modest means into “Rent-to- Own” programs. Loan subsidies can be forgiven over time as the owner stays in the house.

 

Charbonnet: As Mayor, my administration would emphasize facilitating musicians housing. The development of affordable housing in New Orleans, especially for our working people, has not kept pace with the growing demand. My administration will approach this problem aggressively by prioritizing the development of safe, healthy and affordable rental units and homeownership near jobs and essential public services.

We are losing our natural musicians village with fewer and fewer musicians living in Treme, the birthplace of Jazz. It is apparent that this city is in an affordable housing crisis, this crisis hits our cultural economy the hardest. I have put together a detailed plan to address the affordability crisis and made it public for everyone to view. Please visit DesireeCharbonnet.com and send me your thoughts and ideas.

 

Smith: I have responded to questionnaires concerning these exact issues with other organizations who were to protect the citizens of New Orleans from such invasive and determined actions from those who clearly knows that this is happening to these neighborhoods. The other concern I have is that these new (culture wipeouts) are not able to afford these homes once this gentrification of African American neighborhoods are complete. They have high turnover of homeownerships; usually most of these homes have been owned by at least four homeowners within the last five years! Where is the stability after these homeowners move out these long-standing African American families that made those neighborhoods what they were? Finally, after a high turnover of homeowners, then it becomes a short-term rental, so that the African Americans who once stayed in those neighborhoods are not able to afford them nor return.

 

Hill: The root cause of gentrification is over-speculation. This speculation drives up housing prices as well as the cost of living. The reason why the over-speculation is occurring in neighborhoods such as Central City, Treme, and the 7th Ward is this city’s policy of growth. Development Districts and revitalization projects are the destroying neighborhoods by creating a false demand or fake gold-rush for property. Because the city is trying to grow, it opened the floodgate rather than turn on the faucet. There has been too much investment too quickly which has made investors overpay in an overinflated market, and thus drive up the price and cost. The property is not worth what people are paying for it, the quality of renovations does not match the price, and then the mortgages are too high. The city Assessor then comes along and over-values properties thus inflating the housing bubble more and adversely affecting the cost of living. Because we have a weak economy, we do not have the kind of jobs that provide incomes high enough to afford these neighborhoods. People on fixed incomes are at the most risk because their assessments, cost of living, and taxes have the ability to push them out.

We need to stop over-saturating the market west of the Industrial Canal. We are building too much too fast, and it is causing speculation to overinflate the prices of homes in Orleans Parish. This is only exacerbated by the shotty work, overbilling, and a shrinking population. I will delay recovery districts and spread out their project lifetime to curb the over-speculation that is ruining neighborhoods across the city.

I will focus on growth in New Orleans East, the gateway to New Orleans. We are going to use a concept called Urban Centers to deal with affordable housing, busing, jobs, childcare, economic growth, and parking. Urban Centers are primarily used in Suburban areas and are designed to mimic a busy city block. It is usually a 1sq mile plot of land with at least one high-rise mixed-used zoning building that houses residential, retail, and commercial uses. The area surrounding the high-rise consist of a grocery store, entertainment, restaurants, outdoor plaza, parking, bus depot, shopping, green-space, government services, and apartments. Urban Centers are designed to preserve low-income housing while providing jobs and easy access to transportation and education.

With smarter policies, we can deflate the housing bubble and reduce the cost of living. I assure you that I will bring down property taxes so that our elderly and fixed income citizens are insulated from future over-speculation. We are smarter than the problems that face us.

 

Vassel: I was born and raised in Treme and currently live on the same block that I was born on.  I was a member of Providence Housing which redeveloped the Lafitte Housing.  I am going to use all of the remaining properties that NORA owns and use those properties for affordable housing.

Cantrell: I think in order for New Orleans to be considered a world class city, we need a world class public transportation system that takes into account o ur workers and not just tourists. I will want to fully examine the budget to see where the money can come from. Additionally, we should work with RTA and groups such as Ride to ensure we are taking advantage of all federal funding. I also interested in providing shuttles and other methods so musicians and other hospitality workers can safely and cost effectively get to work.   Henry: This is primarily a technical problem. NORTA and Transdev should make this an objective and I will hold them to it. We need to add more buses to the NORTA system for many reasons. Note that increasing the supply of affordable housing nearer downtown should alleviate some of the transportation challenges.   Charbonnet: I am a strong advocate for public transportation, My administration will work with transportation experts and RTA to determine where our existing needs are. Right now our existing transportation system needs to be more efficient, frequent, and on time. Investing in and expanding RTA is essential.   Smith: I had the opportunity last month to take a bus ride on the RTA Ride Line that discussed those issues. Once I become Mayor of New Orleans, I will definitely connect those gabs in public transportation and also have a special bus line for musicians so that they can get back and forth to their jobs (gigs).   Hill: Our RTA does a mediocre job at moving our citizens around this city, and if it does not improve, then we will need to do some serious revisions to their contract. Our public transit needs to be more flexible, more proactive, and reach more people. I am well aware of how long it takes to get from the East to the French Quarter, and it is unacceptable. The longer the ride, the more families are disrupted. To compound that, workers who get off of work late don’t necessarily have a bus that takes them closer to their home which puts them at risk of crime. The RTA has plenty of funding they just need to stop spending money on conference rooms that are not handicapped equipped. The RTA needs to spend money on assessing how they can perform their job better. I vow that we will not raise the cost of using Public Transit. The cost is lower than cities of relatable size and population, and the RTA is talking about raising rates; I will oppose this measure with cuts to their budget if they do. If we want to increase revenue, we must increase participation in public transit; this means we need to expand and improve services. To achieve this goal, we must fundamentally change how we approach problem-solving. I specialize in improving organizational performance, and as Mayor, I will reach out to the RTA with strategies to cut their operational costs and improve their scope and access of their services. Together we will improve public transit and reduce operating costs.   Vassel: I plan to seek Federal dollars to seek light rail from N.O. East to the CBD.  As Mayor I appoint the members of the RTA Board and will demand better routes and more buses that meet the needs of the most vulnerable.

Cantrell: I think in order for New Orleans to be considered a world class city, we need a world class public transportation system that takes into account o ur workers and not just tourists. I will want to fully examine the budget to see where the money can come from. Additionally, we should work with RTA and groups such as Ride to ensure we are taking advantage of all federal funding. I also interested in providing shuttles and other methods so musicians and other hospitality workers can safely and cost effectively get to work.

 

Henry: This is primarily a technical problem. NORTA and Transdev should make this an objective and I will hold them to it. We need to add more buses to the NORTA system for many reasons.

Note that increasing the supply of affordable housing nearer downtown should alleviate some of the transportation challenges.

 

Charbonnet: I am a strong advocate for public transportation, My administration will work with transportation experts and RTA to determine where our existing needs are. Right now our existing transportation system needs to be more efficient, frequent, and on time. Investing in and expanding RTA is essential.

 

Smith: I had the opportunity last month to take a bus ride on the RTA Ride Line that discussed those issues. Once I become Mayor of New Orleans, I will definitely connect those gabs in public transportation and also have a special bus line for musicians so that they can get back and forth to their jobs (gigs).

 

Hill: Our RTA does a mediocre job at moving our citizens around this city, and if it does not improve, then we will need to do some serious revisions to their contract. Our public transit needs to be more flexible, more proactive, and reach more people. I am well aware of how long it takes to get from the East to the French Quarter, and it is unacceptable. The longer the ride, the more families are disrupted. To compound that, workers who get off of work late don’t necessarily have a bus that takes them closer to their home which puts them at risk of crime.

The RTA has plenty of funding they just need to stop spending money on conference rooms that are not handicapped equipped. The RTA needs to spend money on assessing how they can perform their job better. I vow that we will not raise the cost of using Public Transit. The cost is lower than cities of relatable size and population, and the RTA is talking about raising rates; I will oppose this measure with cuts to their budget if they do. If we want to increase revenue, we must increase participation in public transit; this means we need to expand and improve services. To achieve this goal, we must fundamentally change how we approach problem-solving. I specialize in improving organizational performance, and as Mayor, I will reach out to the RTA with strategies to cut their operational costs and improve their scope and access of their services. Together we will improve public transit and reduce operating costs.

 

Vassel: I plan to seek Federal dollars to seek light rail from N.O. East to the CBD.  As Mayor I appoint the members of the RTA Board and will demand better routes and more buses that meet the needs of the most vulnerable.

Cantrell: This starts with creating a more equitable New Orleans. I think we need to address increasing wages and lowering costs. I have advocated for a higher minimum wage, but I have also worked hard to increase affordable housing opportunities, and to create better transit options for our people. I am going to continue to do so as mayor. I am also working with the masking community to create a city-recognized council that could provide a means of support for Mardi Gras Indians, social aid and pleasure clubs and other communities to be able to benefit from the marketing and branding of their culture. We need to end the exploitation of our people and create means by which our musicians can profit off of the culture that profits off of them. I also believe we can do a better job of connecting some of the organizations that have access to funding like NOTMC to our musicians. Something that I would consider is expanding the Mayor’s Office on Cultural Economy to include economic growth for the local music industry. Finally, we already have organizations like NOTMC, that are well-funded to market our culture, why can’t they be leveraged to educate businesses and create opportunities based off of these tax incentives? We need to be more collaborative and strategic. That is the approach that I have taken as a community organizer and councilmember and it is the approach that I will take as mayor.   Henry: Our musicians, artists, and other Culture Bearers are indeed living expressions of our traditions, but they are also Small Businesses. It is right and proper that be successful as businesses. The City and nonprofit organizations can help teach them – like any small businesses – the best ways to price their services, advertise, accept payments, limit give-aways, incorporate, set up bank accounts, and so on. New Orleans has a long tradition of entrepreneurship and hustle; this can and will work for cultural businesses. There is great potential in helping local artists “export,” i.e. increase sales and tours elsewhere in the US and the world, but this will require further study.   Charbonnet: As Mayor I am willing to take the next step to work together with musicians and stakeholders in the music industry to determine what is the best way city government can help facilitate economic growth for artists working in our cultural economy. One way is to treat musicians as small businesses. Many musicians work not only in the music industry, but also as creative business owners, in the hospitality industry, and in many other unique jobs. The city can work to help musicians develop everything from a business plan to connecting them with other musicians can help increase revenues. As important to our city as music is, and it’s essential, we must adopt “best practices” when it comes to fostering a thriving music community.   Smith: I am a native New Orleanian! I breathe this culture! I wake up in this culture. I AM THAT! I plan to review all revenues coming into this city concerning economic development and how this city markets its culture. I will not use the bait and switch method to draw people here and then forget the people who made it happen. I plan to set up trusts accounts that can only be asset by the musicians, the Ancient Indian Tribes of New Orleans and their descendants.   Hill: As Mayor, I will assist our businesses in leaning out their budgets as well as introducing win-sharing in larger companies such as Marriott, Sheraton, Lowes, Harrah’s, etc. Since I will be performing a systematic overhaul of our municipal government, I will be bringing down the operational costs of Orleans Parish. Reducing the operational costs of the city will allow me to offer tax incentives for businesses that provide win-sharing and gain-sharing for their employees. Musicians need more opportunities to make money, so I want to eliminate the city’s Mayoralty Permit that governs Live Entertainment so that bars and restaurants do not need a permit to have live music. This will allow any bar or restaurant to hire musicians all over the city and this eliminates restrictions imposed by zoning districts. The Mayor cannot ensure that street performers get paid for their work, but I can increase tourism and provide a larger pool of potential customers. I will also pull the Police away from enforcing action against street artists, musicians, and cultural bearers by handling that through the quality of life officers rather than regular officers. Quality of life officers tend to understand the situation better and act less aggressively.   Vassel: The $7.4 billion does not go directly to the City’s coffers.  Most of those dollars go to private businesses, which City Government has little control.  As Mayor and a CPA for over 36 years, I will convene a committee to examine ways to get more of the $7.4 billion into the City’s budget so we can address the concerns of our musicians, artists and etc.

Cantrell: This starts with creating a more equitable New Orleans. I think we need to address increasing wages and lowering costs. I have advocated for a higher minimum wage, but I have also worked hard to increase affordable housing opportunities, and to create better transit options for our people. I am going to continue to do so as mayor.

I am also working with the masking community to create a city-recognized council that could provide a means of support for Mardi Gras Indians, social aid and pleasure clubs and other communities to be able to benefit from the marketing and branding of their culture. We need to end the exploitation of our people and create means by which our musicians can profit off of the culture that profits off of them. I also believe we can do a better job of connecting some of the organizations that have access to funding like NOTMC to our musicians.

Something that I would consider is expanding the Mayor’s Office on Cultural Economy to include economic growth for the local music industry. Finally, we already have organizations like NOTMC, that are well-funded to market our culture, why can’t they be leveraged to educate businesses and create opportunities based off of these tax incentives? We need to be more collaborative and strategic. That is the approach that I have taken as a community organizer and councilmember and it is the approach that I will take as mayor.

 

Henry: Our musicians, artists, and other Culture Bearers are indeed living expressions of our traditions, but they are also Small Businesses. It is right and proper that be successful as businesses. The City and nonprofit organizations can help teach them – like any small businesses – the best ways to price their services, advertise, accept payments, limit give-aways, incorporate, set up bank accounts, and so on. New Orleans has a long tradition of entrepreneurship and hustle; this can and will work for cultural businesses.

There is great potential in helping local artists “export,” i.e. increase sales and tours elsewhere in the US and the world, but this will require further study.

 

Charbonnet: As Mayor I am willing to take the next step to work together with musicians and stakeholders in the music industry to determine what is the best way city government can help facilitate economic growth for artists working in our cultural economy.

One way is to treat musicians as small businesses. Many musicians work not only in the music industry, but also as creative business owners, in the hospitality industry, and in many other unique jobs. The city can work to help musicians develop everything from a business plan to connecting them with other musicians can help increase revenues. As important to our city as music is, and it’s essential, we must adopt “best practices” when it comes to fostering a thriving music community.

 

Smith: I am a native New Orleanian! I breathe this culture! I wake up in this culture. I AM THAT! I plan to review all revenues coming into this city concerning economic development and how this city markets its culture. I will not use the bait and switch method to draw people here and then forget the people who made it happen. I plan to set up trusts accounts that can only be asset by the musicians, the Ancient Indian Tribes of New Orleans and their descendants.

 

Hill: As Mayor, I will assist our businesses in leaning out their budgets as well as introducing win-sharing in larger companies such as Marriott, Sheraton, Lowes, Harrah’s, etc. Since I will be performing a systematic overhaul of our municipal government, I will be bringing down the operational costs of Orleans Parish. Reducing the operational costs of the city will allow me to offer tax incentives for businesses that provide win-sharing and gain-sharing for their employees.

Musicians need more opportunities to make money, so I want to eliminate the city’s Mayoralty Permit that governs Live Entertainment so that bars and restaurants do not need a permit to have live music. This will allow any bar or restaurant to hire musicians all over the city and this eliminates restrictions imposed by zoning districts.

The Mayor cannot ensure that street performers get paid for their work, but I can increase tourism and provide a larger pool of potential customers. I will also pull the Police away from enforcing action against street artists, musicians, and cultural bearers by handling that through the quality of life officers rather than regular officers. Quality of life officers tend to understand the situation better and act less aggressively.

 

Vassel: The $7.4 billion does not go directly to the City’s coffers.  Most of those dollars go to private businesses, which City Government has little control.  As Mayor and a CPA for over 36 years, I will convene a committee to examine ways to get more of the $7.4 billion into the City’s budget so we can address the concerns of our musicians, artists and etc.

Cantrell: I feel that we are often nickeling and diming our people and its effect is obviously more impactful on our poorer residents. It’s unfair and I want to reform our fees and fines structure.   Henry: Reduce fees for Social Aid and Pleasure Club activities so that they match Mardi Gras parade fees.   Charbonnet: Social Aid and Pleasure clubs are some of New Orleans’s most important civic institutions. Government has to work with these clubs to make sure they are paying a fair and equitable fee for their annual second lines. Under the current fee structure, Second lines clearly pay more than their fair share of fees. My administration will work with Safety and Permits to reduce these fees, while still making sure that all safety standards are met.   Smith: Why do African Americans in New Orleans pay so much for their gifts? If you look at the commercials celebrating New Orleans culture for the 300 Tricentennial, it is inundated with black culture. However, when it comes to providing for this culture, protecting this culture and preserving this culture, it is denied and then penalized. I plan on addressing this with the SA&PC, the Economic Development and Workforce within the Business Alliances and the Tribal Indians.   Hill: I will certainly address the fee disparity when we are overhauling our fine and fee structure for the city. I will bring down all fines and fees including those regarding second lines. The second line fee structure will be overhauled so that we simplify the process by creating inclusive packaging to reduce costs to Social Clubs. We want more parades, more second lines, and more neighborhood participation. To achieve this we need to make the process easier and less expensive. I will streamline the process of acquiring police escorts so that we can reduce administrative costs and the officers can get paid properly.   Vassel: As Mayor I will change our policies on the fee structure to make sure it is equitable for all participants.

Cantrell: I feel that we are often nickeling and diming our people and its effect is obviously more impactful on our poorer residents. It’s unfair and I want to reform our fees and fines structure.

 

Henry: Reduce fees for Social Aid and Pleasure Club activities so that they match Mardi Gras parade fees.

 

Charbonnet: Social Aid and Pleasure clubs are some of New Orleans’s most important civic institutions. Government has to work with these clubs to make sure they are paying a fair and equitable fee for their annual second lines. Under the current fee structure, Second lines clearly pay more than their fair share of fees. My administration will work with Safety and Permits to reduce these fees, while still making sure that all safety standards are met.

 

Smith: Why do African Americans in New Orleans pay so much for their gifts? If you look at the commercials celebrating New Orleans culture for the 300 Tricentennial, it is inundated with black culture. However, when it comes to providing for this culture, protecting this culture and preserving this culture, it is denied and then penalized.

I plan on addressing this with the SA&PC, the Economic Development and Workforce within the Business Alliances and the Tribal Indians.

 

Hill: I will certainly address the fee disparity when we are overhauling our fine and fee structure for the city. I will bring down all fines and fees including those regarding second lines. The second line fee structure will be overhauled so that we simplify the process by creating inclusive packaging to reduce costs to Social Clubs. We want more parades, more second lines, and more neighborhood participation. To achieve this we need to make the process easier and less expensive. I will streamline the process of acquiring police escorts so that we can reduce administrative costs and the officers can get paid properly.

 

Vassel: As Mayor I will change our policies on the fee structure to make sure it is equitable for all participants.

Cantrell: I support the plan in theory but the execution of the plan will dictate my overall support. I support the use of crime cameras but I would open up the budget of the plan to other possible uses and I would be more communicative with neighborhoods about where cameras will be placed and how they would be used.   Henry:  Like any other public program, the current security plan should be evaluated over time and modified or discontinued in light of the evidence. I would keep crime cameras, especially those focused on crime hot spots. I am opposed to requiring bars in the French Quarter to close their doors at 3 am.   Charbonnet: I support the installation of security cameras in 20 crime hotspots throughout the city. New Orleans is facing an undermanned police department and crime cameras can help deter crime, make our citizens feel more secure, and help the police solve crime quickly and efficiently. I would work with bars and business owners in the French Quarter to come up with effective ways to make sure their patrons are safe, without forcing them to close their doors at 3 am. New Orleans is known for its twenty-four hour French Quarter and unless there are compelling reasons to the contrary we should work to keep it open for business.   Smith: I never heard of this $40 million dollar plan before?   Hill: I absolutely oppose the Landrieu Administration’s Security Plan. There is nothing in that plan that I agree with. I do not believe that cameras all over the place are deterrents to crime nor do I believe that it is Constitutional to continually monitor citizens. I will put officers in the neighborhoods walking the beat, not cameras. Street Parties are part of our culture, and the current administration does not see it that way. I will protect our citizens’ rights to gather spontaneously and have a party. Sometimes neighborhoods need to have a block party on a Saturday afternoon to bring people together. I will not increase regulations for strip clubs nor will I add any regulations for music venues.  I was at the first meetings before MaCCNO was MaCCNO because the Landrieu Administration had begun trying to exploit more money out of music venues and squash the rights of street performers. I was wrapped up in the Music Purge of 2012 as an owner of a Music Venue in a district zoned specifically for music. The 8th District Police put me under investigation for having live music. So, as a victim of the Music Purge of 2012, I assure you that I will defend the rights of musicians, music venues, street performers, and cultural bearers of every kind. MaCCNO will always have my ear, and I will look to you for answers to questions I may have as Mayor of New Orleans.   Vassel: I have not reviewed the current administration’s Security plan at this time.  

Cantrell: I support the plan in theory but the execution of the plan will dictate my overall support. I support the use of crime cameras but I would open up the budget of the plan to other possible uses and I would be more communicative with neighborhoods about where cameras will be placed and how they would be used.

 

Henry:  Like any other public program, the current security plan should be evaluated over time and modified or discontinued in light of the evidence.

I would keep crime cameras, especially those focused on crime hot spots.

I am opposed to requiring bars in the French Quarter to close their doors at 3 am.

 

Charbonnet: I support the installation of security cameras in 20 crime hotspots throughout the city. New Orleans is facing an undermanned police department and crime cameras can help deter crime, make our citizens feel more secure, and help the police solve crime quickly and efficiently.

I would work with bars and business owners in the French Quarter to come up with effective ways to make sure their patrons are safe, without forcing them to close their doors at 3 am. New Orleans is known for its twenty-four hour French Quarter and unless there are compelling reasons to the contrary we should work to keep it open for business.

 

Smith: I never heard of this $40 million dollar plan before?

 

Hill: I absolutely oppose the Landrieu Administration’s Security Plan. There is nothing in that plan that I agree with. I do not believe that cameras all over the place are deterrents to crime nor do I believe that it is Constitutional to continually monitor citizens. I will put officers in the neighborhoods walking the beat, not cameras. Street Parties are part of our culture, and the current administration does not see it that way. I will protect our citizens’ rights to gather spontaneously and have a party. Sometimes neighborhoods need to have a block party on a Saturday afternoon to bring people together.

I will not increase regulations for strip clubs nor will I add any regulations for music venues.  I was at the first meetings before MaCCNO was MaCCNO because the Landrieu Administration had begun trying to exploit more money out of music venues and squash the rights of street performers. I was wrapped up in the Music Purge of 2012 as an owner of a Music Venue in a district zoned specifically for music. The 8th District Police put me under investigation for having live music. So, as a victim of the Music Purge of 2012, I assure you that I will defend the rights of musicians, music venues, street performers, and cultural bearers of every kind. MaCCNO will always have my ear, and I will look to you for answers to questions I may have as Mayor of New Orleans.

 

Vassel: I have not reviewed the current administration’s Security plan at this time.

 

Cantrell: This is part of policy platform for jobs, businesses and transportation. P rovide access to capital and resources to small business such as barbershops, beauty salons, bars, music venues and other bricks and mortar businesses. Too often, these businesses have been overlooked in our emerging entrepreneurial community, but incubators like Propeller are expanding their focus to include them and I will support this effort as mayor.   Henry: They are all small businesses and can benefit from the same training on small business strategies that I would suggest for culture bearers, as described above in my answer to question #4.   Charbonnet: My administration will create a task force that will work as a liaison between the mayor’s office and artists to propose specialized policies and hear complaints. This liaison will be from within the local music industry, and will be able to “speak the language” of local musicians and understand their points of view. The best way that government can support neighborhood venues is to hear directly from them, what their thoughts and concerns are.   Smith: I will have a meeting(s) with those proprietors and let them tell me what their needs are and how I can serve them.   Hill: I will begin by providing neighborhood and cultural businesses with tax breaks. Every bar owner, music venue, or cultural business owner would love to devote more cash flow to improve their company. I will do away with live entertainment permits so that business owners can put that money toward hiring more musicians. Also, by eliminating entertainment permits, musicians will have the ability to play ALL over the city rather than just competing for a few slots at specific spots. I believe that this will help music grow and open new opportunities for our musicians to flourish. Our music is not just for tourists, and by spreading it throughout the city, music enthusiasts will not have to compete with tourists to see their favorite artist. I believe we are a music city and our city should remove barriers to cultural opportunities.   Vassel: As a life-long resident of Treme, I have always supported the neighborhood bars,  music venues and cultural businesses and will continue to do so as Mayor.

Cantrell: This is part of policy platform for jobs, businesses and transportation. P rovide access to capital and resources to small business such as barbershops, beauty salons, bars, music venues and other bricks and mortar businesses. Too often, these businesses have been overlooked in our emerging entrepreneurial community, but incubators like Propeller are expanding their focus to include them and I will support this effort as mayor.

 

Henry: They are all small businesses and can benefit from the same training on small business strategies that I would suggest for culture bearers, as described above in my answer to question #4.

 

Charbonnet: My administration will create a task force that will work as a liaison between the mayor’s office and artists to propose specialized policies and hear complaints. This liaison will be from within the local music industry, and will be able to “speak the language” of local musicians and understand their points of view. The best way that government can support neighborhood venues is to hear directly from them, what their thoughts and concerns are.

 

Smith: I will have a meeting(s) with those proprietors and let them tell me what their needs are and how I can serve them.

 

Hill: I will begin by providing neighborhood and cultural businesses with tax breaks. Every bar owner, music venue, or cultural business owner would love to devote more cash flow to improve their company. I will do away with live entertainment permits so that business owners can put that money toward hiring more musicians. Also, by eliminating entertainment permits, musicians will have the ability to play ALL over the city rather than just competing for a few slots at specific spots. I believe that this will help music grow and open new opportunities for our musicians to flourish. Our music is not just for tourists, and by spreading it throughout the city, music enthusiasts will not have to compete with tourists to see their favorite artist. I believe we are a music city and our city should remove barriers to cultural opportunities.

 

Vassel: As a life-long resident of Treme, I have always supported the neighborhood bars,  music venues and cultural businesses and will continue to do so as Mayor.

Cantrell: The way we regulate noise and sound does not work for anyone. Our current noise ordinance is not enforceable, and when officials try to enforce it, the approach is heavy handed. We should discuss the curfew in context of reforming the ordinance. I do think we can do better, but I will not make any changes to the current ordinance until I re-engage with the music community, neighborhoods and anyone else that could be affected by changes to the current law.   Henry: Yes, the curfew should be removed in the French Quarter.   Charbonnet: We need to work together to find a middle ground when it comes to musicians working past curfew. I am willing to work with advocates and other members of the community to figure out what is the best way to balance working musicians and the needs of neighbors. We should take a common sense approach and sit musicians and stakeholders in this community down to figure out how to get everyone on the same page. Our musicians are a valuable part of our community and my administration will reflect that in every decision.   Smith: Absolutely! I cannot believe such an ordinance exists.   Hill: I do support the permanent removal of the 8pm street musician curfew. The curfew is not appropriate for a city that prides itself on entertaining its tourists. Our street performers need to have more flexible hours. I do not believe that shutting down Jackson Square at night keeps anyone safe.   Vassel: Yes, for adults, but not our children.

Cantrell: The way we regulate noise and sound does not work for anyone. Our current noise ordinance is not enforceable, and when officials try to enforce it, the approach is heavy handed. We should discuss the curfew in context of reforming the ordinance. I do think we can do better, but I will not make any changes to the current ordinance until I re-engage with the music community, neighborhoods and anyone else that could be affected by changes to the current law.

 

Henry: Yes, the curfew should be removed in the French Quarter.

 

Charbonnet: We need to work together to find a middle ground when it comes to musicians working past curfew. I am willing to work with advocates and other members of the community to figure out what is the best way to balance working musicians and the needs of neighbors. We should take a common sense approach and sit musicians and stakeholders in this community down to figure out how to get everyone on the same page. Our musicians are a valuable part of our community and my administration will reflect that in every decision.

 

Smith: Absolutely! I cannot believe such an ordinance exists.

 

Hill: I do support the permanent removal of the 8pm street musician curfew. The curfew is not appropriate for a city that prides itself on entertaining its tourists. Our street performers need to have more flexible hours. I do not believe that shutting down Jackson Square at night keeps anyone safe.

 

Vassel: Yes, for adults, but not our children.

Cantrell: As previously stated, I would like to look at expanding t he Mayor’s Office on Cultural Economy and creating a city-recognized committee for our music, masking and other culture bearer communities so that government is listening, collaborating and building consensus before implementing policies and decisions that affect these communities. This has always been my process--it worked particularly well with the smoke-free ordinance--and I will continue this process as mayor.   Henry: The best thing that the City government can do to foster artists is to leave them alone to be creative in their own ways. Too much government involvement could stifle creativity. If anything, we can make sure that the laws of the City enable a decent supply of performance spaces and times so that artists can perform for their audiences.   Charbonnet: I’ve focused my career on being a bridge builder, and that will not stop when I become mayor. I will work with our many diverse communities on policies that take into consideration the values of each of these groups.   Smith: I find that after 2006, there are a great deal of ordinances against music, ancient cultures and Sainthood. As far as partnering with these cultures is almost asking me how will I partner with my hair? Already I am.   Hill: There are multiple mechanisms in place for me have a conversation with the public regarding crafting policy. First, I will look to you MaCCNO for information and help crafting policy. I trust you and I know that you put the culture and cultural bearers first and I appreciate that. Next, I will utilize the Office of Cultural Economy as a tool to be a direct link to culture bearers. I will expand on what will happen with the office in question 13. Finally, I will offer myself on a weekly radio show that will allow citizens to call in and address legislation and policy directly. I will specifically address the cultural side of every policy in a public conversation so that everyone is on the same page. If it is not done in a public fashion rest assured that I will reach out to MaCCNO for input on cultural impact, and your assessment.   Vassel: As Mayor, I will work with the groups above to develop consensus policies to promote and respect the culture

Cantrell: As previously stated, I would like to look at expanding t he Mayor’s Office on Cultural Economy and creating a city-recognized committee for our music, masking and other culture bearer communities so that government is listening, collaborating and building consensus before implementing policies and decisions that affect these communities. This has always been my process--it worked particularly well with the smoke-free ordinance--and I will continue this process as mayor.

 

Henry: The best thing that the City government can do to foster artists is to leave them alone to be creative in their own ways. Too much government involvement could stifle creativity.

If anything, we can make sure that the laws of the City enable a decent supply of performance spaces and times so that artists can perform for their audiences.

 

Charbonnet: I’ve focused my career on being a bridge builder, and that will not stop when I become mayor. I will work with our many diverse communities on policies that take into consideration the values of each of these groups.

 

Smith: I find that after 2006, there are a great deal of ordinances against music, ancient cultures and Sainthood. As far as partnering with these cultures is almost asking me how will I partner with my hair? Already I am.

 

Hill: There are multiple mechanisms in place for me have a conversation with the public regarding crafting policy. First, I will look to you MaCCNO for information and help crafting policy. I trust you and I know that you put the culture and cultural bearers first and I appreciate that. Next, I will utilize the Office of Cultural Economy as a tool to be a direct link to culture bearers. I will expand on what will happen with the office in question 13. Finally, I will offer myself on a weekly radio show that will allow citizens to call in and address legislation and policy directly. I will specifically address the cultural side of every policy in a public conversation so that everyone is on the same page. If it is not done in a public fashion rest assured that I will reach out to MaCCNO for input on cultural impact, and your assessment.

 

Vassel: As Mayor, I will work with the groups above to develop consensus policies to promote and respect the culture

Cantrell: Investing in education, youth, and families is crucial for improving long term economic opportunity / equity, fostering the city’s economic growth, revitalizing neighborhoods, and improving public safety and quality of life. This should include cultural activity and I propose creating an Office of Youth and Families so that we can connect our kids with the vast amount of opportunities available such as NORDC, New Orleans Public Library, sports leagues and music and art programs. For many years, I have supported our public library system and led Broadmoor’s effort to create the city’s only library and community center. One of the outstanding features of the Rosa Keller Library and Community Center is the wide array of programming, which includes cultural programs. I would like to see that effort expanded more and more throughout our city.   Henry: The best way for the arts to act as a crime prevention tool is to engage the kids early in life.   Charbonnet: Culture is not only an integral part of New Orleans, but I truly believe it is an asset for crime prevention. I would expand existing programs, e.g. those under the auspices of NORD, to partner with other nonprofit organizations like YaYa and other members of our cultural community to truly help make New Orleans safer, while providing an outlet for our children. Better integration of the public sector, nonprofits, and businesses can help reduce crime while fostering our vital New Orleans culture.   Smith: I am going to use my executive powers concerning these and a few other issues around this subject.   Hill: Education goes hand in hand with our crime. We need to improve our education system and increase our focus on sports, dance, art, and music. These outlets allow student to be creative and challenge themselves. The reason why children drop out of school is not because they have jobs to work, but because the system does not challenge them in the right way to make them want to stay. Our school system does not have shop classes, nor does it address vocational training. Our school system needs to provide creative outlets as well as specific skills so that our students get used to learning and creating. Sports, dance, art, and music provide the outlets for young men and women to invest in themselves. Our school system requires math and science but it does not require creative outlets such as art, dance, shop, and music. NORDC provides all kinds of courses for our youth to find their creative outlet but I do not believe that it is accessible to enough youth. We need to strengthen NORDC’s scope and access. NORDC could provide mentorship but it needs more resources including warm bodies to provide mentorship. I want to see a stronger cooperation between NORDC and our entire school system. If we want to expand the scope of services then we cannot limit our outreach to community centers.   Vassel: As Mayor, I want to establish more opportunities at our NORD facilities to introduce our young folk to music and other unique culture experiences. 

Cantrell: Investing in education, youth, and families is crucial for improving long term economic opportunity / equity, fostering the city’s economic growth, revitalizing neighborhoods, and improving public safety and quality of life. This should include cultural activity and I propose creating an Office of Youth and Families so that we can connect our kids with the vast amount of opportunities available such as NORDC, New Orleans Public Library, sports leagues and music and art programs.

For many years, I have supported our public library system and led Broadmoor’s effort to create the city’s only library and community center. One of the outstanding features of the Rosa Keller Library and Community Center is the wide array of programming, which includes cultural programs. I would like to see that effort expanded more and more throughout our city.

 

Henry: The best way for the arts to act as a crime prevention tool is to engage the kids early in life.

 

Charbonnet: Culture is not only an integral part of New Orleans, but I truly believe it is an asset for crime prevention. I would expand existing programs, e.g. those under the auspices of NORD, to partner with other nonprofit organizations like YaYa and other members of our cultural community to truly help make New Orleans safer, while providing an outlet for our children. Better integration of the public sector, nonprofits, and businesses can help reduce crime while fostering our vital New Orleans culture.

 

Smith: I am going to use my executive powers concerning these and a few other issues around this subject.

 

Hill: Education goes hand in hand with our crime. We need to improve our education system and increase our focus on sports, dance, art, and music. These outlets allow student to be creative and challenge themselves. The reason why children drop out of school is not because they have jobs to work, but because the system does not challenge them in the right way to make them want to stay. Our school system does not have shop classes, nor does it address vocational training. Our school system needs to provide creative outlets as well as specific skills so that our students get used to learning and creating. Sports, dance, art, and music provide the outlets for young men and women to invest in themselves. Our school system requires math and science but it does not require creative outlets such as art, dance, shop, and music.

NORDC provides all kinds of courses for our youth to find their creative outlet but I do not believe that it is accessible to enough youth. We need to strengthen NORDC’s scope and access. NORDC could provide mentorship but it needs more resources including warm bodies to provide mentorship. I want to see a stronger cooperation between NORDC and our entire school system. If we want to expand the scope of services then we cannot limit our outreach to community centers.

 

Vassel: As Mayor, I want to establish more opportunities at our NORD facilities to introduce our young folk to music and other unique culture experiences. 

Cantrell: The city’s public schools will return to local control under the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) in 2018. This is an opportunity to improve our schools and involve communities. While the mayor’s office doesn’t directly oversee or fund public education, the office, through the creation of an Office of Youth and Families, can serve as a connector and facilitator between the public and private entities invested in education / youth and families. As a Councilperson, I was able to find $10 million in unspent funds, which I redirected to our public school systems. Working with the Office of Youth and Families, as mayor I would be open to leveraging the work of that office to seek to opportunities to perpetuate this tradition within our school system.   Henry: There is a role for the school system and charter schools, but these are properly under the control of the OPSB and RSD, not the mayor’s office. There is also an opportunity for teaching and studying outside the schools. Artists – as small businesses – can gain revenue directly from their students, even outside of a formal classroom setting.   Charbonnet: Building partnerships with NORD and our school system, will help encourage our schools to implement programs that will instruct our students in the arts, music, and culture, maintaining our rich heritage.   Smith: My Administration wants all public schools to return to the New Orleans Public School system where I believe this educational system truly enriched this passage from teacher to student. These current charter schools are not cultivating this atmosphere. This system in place seems to be a detriments to destroy everything that once was New Orleans. The irony of all these changes and ordinance is that this city is in its most deteriorating form I have ever witnessed.   Hill: There are plenty of youth ready and willing to be torchbearers; the issue is that there are not enough mentors to pass down traditions. Mentorship has broken down throughout many industries across our society, and the music industry is no exception. There is a lot to mentorship, but the structure is what is missing. I want to see more of our award-winning musicians expand their mentorship across a larger base. More interactions with schools and NORDC to get children interested as well as provide guidance through the learning process.   Vassel: As Mayor, I will introduce programs at our Nord Facilities.  I will also work with the OPSB and the Superintendent to bring these programs in our schools.

Cantrell: The city’s public schools will return to local control under the Orleans Parish School Board (OPSB) in 2018. This is an opportunity to improve our schools and involve communities. While the mayor’s office doesn’t directly oversee or fund public education, the office, through the creation of an Office of Youth and Families, can serve as a connector and facilitator between the public and private entities invested in education / youth and families.

As a Councilperson, I was able to find $10 million in unspent funds, which I redirected to our public school systems. Working with the Office of Youth and Families, as mayor I would be open to leveraging the work of that office to seek to opportunities to perpetuate this tradition within our school system.

 

Henry: There is a role for the school system and charter schools, but these are properly under the control of the OPSB and RSD, not the mayor’s office.

There is also an opportunity for teaching and studying outside the schools. Artists – as small businesses – can gain revenue directly from their students, even outside of a formal classroom setting.

 

Charbonnet: Building partnerships with NORD and our school system, will help encourage our schools to implement programs that will instruct our students in the arts, music, and culture, maintaining our rich heritage.

 

Smith: My Administration wants all public schools to return to the New Orleans Public School system where I believe this educational system truly enriched this passage from teacher to student. These current charter schools are not cultivating this atmosphere. This system in place seems to be a detriments to destroy everything that once was New Orleans. The irony of all these changes and ordinance is that this city is in its most deteriorating form I have ever witnessed.

 

Hill: There are plenty of youth ready and willing to be torchbearers; the issue is that there are not enough mentors to pass down traditions. Mentorship has broken down throughout many industries across our society, and the music industry is no exception. There is a lot to mentorship, but the structure is what is missing. I want to see more of our award-winning musicians expand their mentorship across a larger base. More interactions with schools and NORDC to get children interested as well as provide guidance through the learning process.

 

Vassel: As Mayor, I will introduce programs at our Nord Facilities.  I will also work with the OPSB and the Superintendent to bring these programs in our schools.

Cantrell: Yes   Henry: DPW should permit the appropriate number of loading zones but not for the exclusive use of musicians.   Charbonnet: Musicians are valuable assets and creating priority loading/unloading zones for musicians is a good idea. Once elected I will use the transition period to review important suggestions like priority loading zone with business owners and musicians to determine the most effective way to achieve the ultimate goal, to keep musicans safe and help them be on time and ready for their performances.   Smith: Again, I have never seen such notorieties against the culture of New Orleans since 2006.   Hill: Yes, loading and unloading is a priority because it speaks to a larger issue, loading zones and how they are enforced. First, I will bring the parking back to pre-Katrina prices and roll the hours back to 5pm. Then, this will open up how we handle loading zones. There are different loading zone times throughout the city and many of them cease to be loading zones after 7pm, this does not help the band that goes on at 9pm. In areas such as Frenchmen St. we need to add loading zones and change the hours of those loading zones. There is also an issue with how the city deals with loading zones, we patrol street parking where big events are, not where musicians need to load and unload. We need to enforce passenger and loading zones on Frenchmen and inside the French Quarter. The city must reassess who needs loading zones and how we enforce them.   Vassel: Yes.

Cantrell: Yes

 

Henry: DPW should permit the appropriate number of loading zones but not for the exclusive use of musicians.

 

Charbonnet: Musicians are valuable assets and creating priority loading/unloading zones for musicians is a good idea. Once elected I will use the transition period to review important suggestions like priority loading zone with business owners and musicians to determine the most effective way to achieve the ultimate goal, to keep musicans safe and help them be on time and ready for their performances.

 

Smith: Again, I have never seen such notorieties against the culture of New Orleans since 2006.

 

Hill: Yes, loading and unloading is a priority because it speaks to a larger issue, loading zones and how they are enforced. First, I will bring the parking back to pre-Katrina prices and roll the hours back to 5pm. Then, this will open up how we handle loading zones. There are different loading zone times throughout the city and many of them cease to be loading zones after 7pm, this does not help the band that goes on at 9pm. In areas such as Frenchmen St. we need to add loading zones and change the hours of those loading zones. There is also an issue with how the city deals with loading zones, we patrol street parking where big events are, not where musicians need to load and unload. We need to enforce passenger and loading zones on Frenchmen and inside the French Quarter. The city must reassess who needs loading zones and how we enforce them.

 

Vassel: Yes.

Cantrell: Building on what I’ve already addressed for that office, I would want to expand its vision to include seats at the table for our culture bearers so that their voices are heard and we can create policy, decisions and goals for not only maintaining our cultural economy, but also so we are providing resources for its survival. We need to honor our musicians and our culture bearers, and more importantly we need to give them resources so they can thrive. Musicians and the music community have clearly boosted the local economy, particularly the tourism industry, and yet the City hasn’t done nearly enough to recognize that contribution, nor share in the dollars generated. Too many musicians and their families live hand to mouth without health insurance. That needs to stop and under my administration, it will.   Henry: In modified form, yes. I would create a “Chief Community and Cultural Officer,” to promote the arts, support community cultural programs, and evaluate new ideas and as they come along. When appropriate, this office would also bring them to reality. For instance, CCCE would be the ideal place to explore possibilities for increasing artist exports, as mentioned above in question #4.   Charbonnet: Before I take office I will examine every department. Every office, public-private partnership, and recipient of public funds will be reviewed. Pending that review, my administration would work with the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Economy to further develop relationships with musicians and member of the cultural economy in order to facilitate economic growth specifically for them. The Office of Cultural Economy has done a great job helping coordinate cultural events on a large scale, my administration would focus more on keeping the actual musicians in the loop.   Smith: First, this office needs an overhaul. Then I want to see how much revenue it receives from the budget. My vision will remain with this Administration until after the October 14th election.   Hill: I will retain the Office of Cultural Economy; however I am going to make improvements to its functions. Right now it serves as a coordination hub for the Landrieu Administration to give information on how much money cultural bearers owe the city to perform. Essentially it is a portal to zoning and fee schedules. It includes food vending such as ice cream vendors, mobile food trucks, and seafood vendors. I think that seafood vendors are a way of keeping the French Market under the umbrella of the Office of Cultural Economy, which could be done in a more efficient way. I want the Office of Cultural Economy to focus on outreach, actively trying to grow our cultural economy. I want it to provide a network of the entire cultural economy so that the different parts of our cultural economy can communicate directly. I want cultural bearers of all kinds to be able to have a conversation with the city through this office. I want it to provide a portal for direct communication not just a link to fee schedules. I want to thank MaCCNO for being the voice of cultural bearers across our city. You have directly affected the outcome of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance, the Master Plan, and overall public policy. As Mayor I will look to you to help craft future policy and gather information that surveys and studies cannot.   Vassel: I firmly believe that with my experience and living the culture all of my life, we can do a lot better than this current administration has done.

Cantrell: Building on what I’ve already addressed for that office, I would want to expand its vision to include seats at the table for our culture bearers so that their voices are heard and we can create policy, decisions and goals for not only maintaining our cultural economy, but also so we are providing resources for its survival. We need to honor our musicians and our culture bearers, and more importantly we need to give them resources so they can thrive. Musicians and the music community have clearly boosted the local economy, particularly the tourism industry, and yet the City hasn’t done nearly enough to recognize that contribution, nor share in the dollars generated. Too many musicians and their families live hand to mouth without health insurance. That needs to stop and under my administration, it will.

 

Henry: In modified form, yes. I would create a “Chief Community and Cultural Officer,” to promote the arts, support community cultural programs, and evaluate new ideas and as they come along. When appropriate, this office would also bring them to reality. For instance, CCCE would be the ideal place to explore possibilities for increasing artist exports, as mentioned above in question #4.

 

Charbonnet: Before I take office I will examine every department. Every office, public-private partnership, and recipient of public funds will be reviewed. Pending that review, my administration would work with the Mayor’s Office of Cultural Economy to further develop relationships with musicians and member of the cultural economy in order to facilitate economic growth specifically for them. The Office of Cultural Economy has done a great job helping coordinate cultural events on a large scale, my administration would focus more on keeping the actual musicians in the loop.

 

Smith: First, this office needs an overhaul. Then I want to see how much revenue it receives from the budget. My vision will remain with this Administration until after the October 14th election.

 

Hill: I will retain the Office of Cultural Economy; however I am going to make improvements to its functions. Right now it serves as a coordination hub for the Landrieu Administration to give information on how much money cultural bearers owe the city to perform. Essentially it is a portal to zoning and fee schedules. It includes food vending such as ice cream vendors, mobile food trucks, and seafood vendors. I think that seafood vendors are a way of keeping the French Market under the umbrella of the Office of Cultural Economy, which could be done in a more efficient way. I want the Office of Cultural Economy to focus on outreach, actively trying to grow our cultural economy. I want it to provide a network of the entire cultural economy so that the different parts of our cultural economy can communicate directly. I want cultural bearers of all kinds to be able to have a conversation with the city through this office. I want it to provide a portal for direct communication not just a link to fee schedules.

I want to thank MaCCNO for being the voice of cultural bearers across our city. You have directly affected the outcome of the Comprehensive Zoning Ordinance, the Master Plan, and overall public policy. As Mayor I will look to you to help craft future policy and gather information that surveys and studies cannot.

 

Vassel: I firmly believe that with my experience and living the culture all of my life, we can do a lot better than this current administration has done.