Support Us

DISTRICT B

DOWNLOAD FULL QUESTIONNAIRE

Timothy David Ray

Jay Banks

Andre Strumer

Catherine Love

Eugene Ben-Oluwole

Seth Bloom

 

ANSWERS BY QUESTION

Ray: The term can be applied liberally, but I would not call an expropriator or exploiter of a culture a “culture bearer”.   Banks: The term culture bearer applies to those who know, understand and practice the cultural values and traditions of a group or society. Culture bearers can be musicians, artists, dancers, writers, etc. and should be actively transmitting or disseminating the cultural practices.    Bloom: The term culture bearers encompasses so much in our city.  Musicians, street performers, artists, Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs, and masking organizations like Mardi Gras Indians all contribute to our city’s culture.  Any person or group that advances our city’s heritage and unique traditions fit that definition.   Strumer: A Cultural Bearer is someone who does more good than harm.  Regarding the artist’s influence in a community, this definition is wide and varied.  The artist serves the common good of the community.  The growth any community, nation, or civilization goes hand-in-hand with the strength of and support for the artistic community.  The time of Pericles was also the time of Phidias.  The time of Lorenzo de Medici was also the time of Leonardo da Vinci.  The era of Queen Elizabeth was also the era of William Shakespeare.  The artistic community has my full-throated support.   Love: Anyone who has unique cultural values/attributes/knowledge and shares it within the community. The criteria I use is quite liberal. Many confine the concept to immigrants, but I think that there are unique cultures embedded in our individual neighborhoods within our own community. “West-bankers” vs “East-bankers”, athletes vs academics, etc.  As long as the cultural values being shared are positive and enrich the community as a whole, I think the term can be applied.    Ben-Oluwole: I would assume the term “culture bearer” applies to anyone whose life’s work (paid or unpaid) is to uphold and pass on the traditional arts or culture of New Orleans. In general the criteria would include being a native or long-time resident with a proven history of work in one of many New Orleans’ traditional realms – work such as maintaining of a long-held family restaurant, keeping an old Social Aid and Pleasure Club alive, or passing down the basics of jazz to children.

Ray: The term can be applied liberally, but I would not call an expropriator or exploiter of a culture a “culture bearer”.

 

Banks: The term culture bearer applies to those who know, understand and practice the cultural values and traditions of a group or society. Culture bearers can be musicians, artists, dancers, writers, etc. and should be actively transmitting or disseminating the cultural practices. 

 

Bloom: The term culture bearers encompasses so much in our city.  Musicians, street performers, artists, Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs, and masking organizations like Mardi Gras Indians all contribute to our city’s culture.  Any person or group that advances our city’s heritage and unique traditions fit that definition.

 

Strumer: A Cultural Bearer is someone who does more good than harm.  Regarding the artist’s influence in a community, this definition is wide and varied.  The artist serves the common good of the community.  The growth any community, nation, or civilization goes hand-in-hand with the strength of and support for the artistic community.  The time of Pericles was also the time of Phidias.  The time of Lorenzo de Medici was also the time of Leonardo da Vinci.  The era of Queen Elizabeth was also the era of William Shakespeare.  The artistic community has my full-throated support.

 

Love: Anyone who has unique cultural values/attributes/knowledge and shares it within the community.

The criteria I use is quite liberal. Many confine the concept to immigrants, but I think that there are unique cultures embedded in our individual neighborhoods within our own community. “West-bankers” vs “East-bankers”, athletes vs academics, etc.  As long as the cultural values being shared are positive and enrich the community as a whole, I think the term can be applied. 

 

Ben-Oluwole: I would assume the term “culture bearer” applies to anyone whose life’s work (paid or unpaid) is to uphold and pass on the traditional arts or culture of New Orleans. In general the criteria would include being a native or long-time resident with a proven history of work in one of many New Orleans’ traditional realms – work such as maintaining of a long-held family restaurant, keeping an old Social Aid and Pleasure Club alive, or passing down the basics of jazz to children.

Ray: To ensure housing is affordable, I support the proposed Smart Housing Mix ordinance from the City Planning Commission. I know that, if passed, it will secure affordable units for a number of new developments throughout the city. However, because our very culture is being threatened, I feel we must strengthen the proposed ordinance to extend the terms that units must be priced below market rates, and the number of units.In order to help keep residents in their properties, I will be a watchdog for Code Enforcement to ensure their office is not aggressively adding fines, fees, and penalties to homeowners who are making diligent efforts to keep their properties in a safe condition. I support the work of Councilmember Cantrell who discovered the misuse of funds from the Neighborhood Stabilization Fund and saw that those funds would be properly used now to help homeowners make necessary repairs to their homes in order to bring them into compliance with Code Enforcement. I have listened to residents and neighbors with regard to short-term rentals; whole home rentals have had a devastating impact on the very fabric and culture of New Orleans’ neighborhoods and the STR ordinance must be dramatically amended. In addition to the matter of whole home rentals, there is a feeling among neighborhood associations that the current ordinance unfairly protects one New Orleans neighborhood, while leaving the others at risk – this too, must be corrected. I will work on the Council to draft an ordinance that drastically limits whole home rentals, and ensures that all our neighborhoods and homeowners are treated fairly. In District B, Central City is not only facing rising rental costs, but also has a noticeable number of blighted residential and commercial properties or vacant lots. I believe we, as a city, must do all we can to ensure neighborhoods like Central City – where I culture in large part, derives – does not lose any more units or properties to developers who will price out natives to those neighborhoods.   Banks: Affordable housing must be available.  First, we must untie the restrictions on the thousands of the blighted houses throughout the city and use incentives to develop those properties into affordable housing units.  Second, we work to freeze residential property assessments to not penalize long term residents because new residents have driven up property values.   Bloom: Our city is unique and vibrant, and the people who live here make it that way.  We need to protect our residents and ensure they have safe and comfortable places to live. As a councilmember, I will work to create discourse between the council and the departments of Community Development, Economic Development, and HANO to find comprehensive solutions to housing. I will work with developers who are applying to build new structures, to create a percentage of housing units for working class and low-income residents, in accordance with proposals from the Smart Housing Mix policy.  I plan to entice developers to do this by offering positive incentives, rather than enacting restrictive legislation, wherever possible. Legislation to safeguard housing should not have the opposite effect: it should not serve to effectively de-incentivize development, but should encourage smart and responsible development to flourish by offering positive incentives that attract inclusive housing development.  Having more economic opportunities available to residents will help us all succeed.  I will lend my support to any effort to join together the varying interests of residents, government, developers, and community groups to create smart housing solutions. To achieve this holistic approach to housing, I will work to ensure that business and economic leaders, those in the city's departments of Community Development, Economic Development, and HANO have the opportunity to hear from community stakeholders. Again, I will work hand-in-hand with city leadership to create incentives for development to provide residents with access to needed resources like transit, services like pharmacies and groceries, and recreational opportunities. I will place pressure on city governmental departments to work together to create comprehensive plans and requests for proposals that will address the needs of working people in our city.   Strumer:  I am in favour of supporting our long term residents.  I will strongly oppose any expansion of short term rentals.  And I would strongly support stricter restrictions on the current level of short term rentals in favour of reducing the current number of short term rental properties. Apparently, most of the people who are in favour of short term rentals are the people who own the properties over the people who rent those properties.   I also have a plan to change the estimated 30,000 blighted properties into vocational training grounds for youth of the City.  These children will receive training in every aspect of home construction and repair from floors to roofs, plumbing, carpentry, electrical tile work, and more.  Not everyone wants to go to college.  Everyone should have an opportunity to receive good job training.  A. The City gains 1,000s of affordable housing units. B. Children learn a vocation, which willhelp them secure a job in their futures from which they can support themselves and families. C. The journeymen and master craftsmen get paid of teaching the youths. D.  Blighted properties are replaced with usable homes for low income, first time home buyers, Section 8 housing, and musicians.  WIN-WIN-WIN-WIN   Love:  Solving the affordable housing problem in New Orleans requires multiple strategy approach to address the different needs of the different communities and people affected. Understanding that one strategy will not solve this problem is crucial, many city planners, current leaders and candidates fail to recognize this very simple principle. My action plan is as follows: •       I will start with a comprehensive analysis that includes total housing costs, i.e. utilities, taxes and maintenance; transportation costs; and short- and long-term impacts that affect housing cost. •       I will create programs that provide support for lower-income households to repair and maintain their homes coupled with creating a protection from taxes on the increase in value. This is one of the most impactful strategies. •       I will work to remove unjustified restrictions and costs for urban infill development, this is generally the most cost-efficient and beneficial option overall, but is challenging due to local opposition, and because its benefits are widely dispersed. •       I will create legislation and promote limited equity co-ops this strategy is not only a permanent -- at minimum a long-term – solution for affordable housing but it will also transition vulnerable renters into home owners. Lastly, I will create opportunities through my economic development platform that promote worker-owned-businesses, cultural-co-operatives and higher paying jobs to drive the earning potential up for New Orleanians.   Ben-Oluwole: I am very much in support of stronger short-term rental regulation and enforcement. I am also interested in incentivizing home ownership among long-term residents and working class people who now rent. In terms of those who prefer to rent, I would support real estate tax deductions or freezes for landlords who rent to working class citizens at below market rates.

Ray: To ensure housing is affordable, I support the proposed Smart Housing Mix ordinance from the City Planning Commission. I know that, if passed, it will secure affordable units for a number of new developments throughout the city. However, because our very culture is being threatened, I feel we must strengthen the proposed ordinance to extend the terms that units must be priced below market rates, and the number of units.In order to help keep residents in their properties, I will be a watchdog for Code Enforcement to ensure their office is not aggressively adding fines, fees, and penalties to homeowners who are making diligent efforts to keep their properties in a safe condition. I support the work of Councilmember Cantrell who discovered the misuse of funds from the Neighborhood Stabilization Fund and saw that those funds would be properly used now to help homeowners make necessary repairs to their homes in order to bring them into compliance with Code Enforcement.

I have listened to residents and neighbors with regard to short-term rentals; whole home rentals have had a devastating impact on the very fabric and culture of New Orleans’ neighborhoods and the STR ordinance must be dramatically amended. In addition to the matter of whole home rentals, there is a feeling among neighborhood associations that the current ordinance unfairly protects one New Orleans neighborhood, while leaving the others at risk – this too, must be corrected. I will work on the Council to draft an ordinance that drastically limits whole home rentals, and ensures that all our neighborhoods and homeowners are treated fairly.

In District B, Central City is not only facing rising rental costs, but also has a noticeable number of blighted residential and commercial properties or vacant lots. I believe we, as a city, must do all we can to ensure neighborhoods like Central City – where I culture in large part, derives – does not lose any more units or properties to developers who will price out natives to those neighborhoods.

 

Banks: Affordable housing must be available.  First, we must untie the restrictions on the thousands of the blighted houses throughout the city and use incentives to develop those properties into affordable housing units.  Second, we work to freeze residential property assessments to not penalize long term residents because new residents have driven up property values.

 

Bloom: Our city is unique and vibrant, and the people who live here make it that way.  We need to protect our residents and ensure they have safe and comfortable places to live. As a councilmember, I will work to create discourse between the council and the departments of Community Development, Economic Development, and HANO to find comprehensive solutions to housing. I will work with developers who are applying to build new structures, to create a percentage of housing units for working class and low-income residents, in accordance with proposals from the Smart Housing Mix policy.  I plan to entice developers to do this by offering positive incentives, rather than enacting restrictive legislation, wherever possible.

Legislation to safeguard housing should not have the opposite effect: it should not serve to effectively de-incentivize development, but should encourage smart and responsible development to flourish by offering positive incentives that attract inclusive housing development.  Having more economic opportunities available to residents will help us all succeed.  I will lend my support to any effort to join together the varying interests of residents, government, developers, and community groups to create smart housing solutions.

To achieve this holistic approach to housing, I will work to ensure that business and economic leaders, those in the city's departments of Community Development, Economic Development, and HANO have the opportunity to hear from community stakeholders. Again, I will work hand-in-hand with city leadership to create incentives for development to provide residents with access to needed resources like transit, services like pharmacies and groceries, and recreational opportunities. I will place pressure on city governmental departments to work together to create comprehensive plans and requests for proposals that will address the needs of working people in our city.

 

Strumer:  I am in favour of supporting our long term residents.  I will strongly oppose any expansion of short term rentals.  And I would strongly support stricter restrictions on the current level of short term rentals in favour of reducing the current number of short term rental properties. Apparently, most of the people who are in favour of short term rentals are the people who own the properties over the people who rent those properties.   I also have a plan to change the estimated 30,000 blighted properties into vocational training grounds for youth of the City.  These children will receive training in every aspect of home construction and repair from floors to roofs, plumbing, carpentry, electrical tile work, and more.  Not everyone wants to go to college.  Everyone should have an opportunity to receive good job training. 

A. The City gains 1,000s of affordable housing units.

B. Children learn a vocation, which willhelp them secure a job in their futures from which they can support themselves and families.

C. The journeymen and master craftsmen get paid of teaching the youths.

D.  Blighted properties are replaced with usable homes for low income, first time home buyers, Section 8 housing, and musicians. 

WIN-WIN-WIN-WIN

 

Love:  Solving the affordable housing problem in New Orleans requires multiple strategy approach to address the different needs of the different communities and people affected. Understanding that one strategy will not solve this problem is crucial, many city planners, current leaders and candidates fail to recognize this very simple principle. My action plan is as follows:

•       I will start with a comprehensive analysis that includes total housing costs, i.e. utilities, taxes and maintenance; transportation costs; and short- and long-term impacts that affect housing cost.

•       I will create programs that provide support for lower-income households to repair and maintain their homes coupled with creating a protection from taxes on the increase in value. This is one of the most impactful strategies.

•       I will work to remove unjustified restrictions and costs for urban infill development, this is generally the most cost-efficient and beneficial option overall, but is challenging due to local opposition, and because its benefits are widely dispersed.

•       I will create legislation and promote limited equity co-ops this strategy is not only a permanent -- at minimum a long-term – solution for affordable housing but it will also transition vulnerable renters into home owners.

Lastly, I will create opportunities through my economic development platform that promote worker-owned-businesses, cultural-co-operatives and higher paying jobs to drive the earning potential up for New Orleanians.

 

Ben-Oluwole: I am very much in support of stronger short-term rental regulation and enforcement. I am also interested in incentivizing home ownership among long-term residents and working class people who now rent. In terms of those who prefer to rent, I would support real estate tax deductions or freezes for landlords who rent to working class citizens at below market rates.

Ray: I believe public transportation can be both serve riders as both a necessity and a mode of convenient travel. In order to achieve that, public transportation must become more efficient – connecting riders with jobs and gigs with shorter travel times and more reliably. While I fully appreciate the novelty of streetcars and the modern reliance on buses, I would also like to help shape a public transit system that incorporates district-specific circulator vehicles (that would serve a more centralized radius) and more park-and-ride vehicles and stations. I also believe there is an opportunity to explore reduced fees for hospitality workers and musicians. I would work to develop a system that would not easily be malleable and allow for misuse or fraud, but would provide both an incentive and a ‘break’ to the citizens who drive our economy.   Banks: We must make jobs and housing accessible in more widespread locations by increasing transportation options. We can assess RTA rider data for busses and streetcars to see where additional routes are needed. We can also evaluate options for bikes, scooters, reasonable parking and child-care locations that are near transit.   Bloom:  I absolutely support increased public transit for our hospitality workers.  In my discussions with constituents and stakeholders in the industry, I constantly hear how difficult a commute on public transit can be for those who work late shifts and must travel home at off-peak hours.  Inconsistency and delays result in people being late for work or other appointments, often opting to either take a costly cab or ride service, or to leave much earlier than they should, spending unnecessary time away from their families, due to poor on-time performance with bus routes.  I will support a comprehensive accounting of existing routes on RTA lines, and call for public input on creating new options to better serve our working communities.   Strumer: I support a greater expansion of the RTA.  It is shameful that in our great City we have the 53rd ranked mass transit system in the country.  The people who work as artists and musicians and within the 88,000 people of our hospitality and service industries, deserve to have better mass transit to get them to and from work safely and efficiently.  I give the expansion of a reliable mass transit system in New Orleans my full throated support. A. ) 24 hour mass transit service B.) Expanding the existing bus lines. C.) Creating new bus lines. D.) Providing more covered seating areas for waiting on bus lines.   E.) Card swiping to remove the cash transactions, which can be much more dangerous.   F.) Electric Buses to promote green energy choices, which are more reliable, more efficient, and less polluting than our current diesel busses.   Love:  I will enforce criteria for transit expansion investments that is based on Reducing the travel time for commuters Increasing the number of jobs workers can access within 30mins Expanding routes across parish lines I will work to use a local hotel occupancy tax that taxes the tourist not our citizens to provide funding for increasing the number of buses and routes.  I will not support project like the multi-million-dollar Rampart Trolley Extension that only increased the property value for some politicians and their friends and actually reduced the number of jobs people could access. Any investment must demonstrate a clear and measurable impact on those who depend on it to earn a living.   Ben-Oluwole: While the City Council has little direct control over the RTA, I would use my position as councilmember from District B to advocate for more efficient use of RTA money, with more options for door-to-door service in areas or at times with limited service. For instance, this could mean coordination with Lyft or Uber, or an extension of the current RTA Lift Program for seniors.

Ray: I believe public transportation can be both serve riders as both a necessity and a mode of convenient travel. In order to achieve that, public transportation must become more efficient – connecting riders with jobs and gigs with shorter travel times and more reliably. While I fully appreciate the novelty of streetcars and the modern reliance on buses, I would also like to help shape a public transit system that incorporates district-specific circulator vehicles (that would serve a more centralized radius) and more park-and-ride vehicles and stations.

I also believe there is an opportunity to explore reduced fees for hospitality workers and musicians. I would work to develop a system that would not easily be malleable and allow for misuse or fraud, but would provide both an incentive and a ‘break’ to the citizens who drive our economy.

 

Banks: We must make jobs and housing accessible in more widespread locations by increasing transportation options. We can assess RTA rider data for busses and streetcars to see where additional routes are needed. We can also evaluate options for bikes, scooters, reasonable parking and child-care locations that are near transit.

 

Bloom:  I absolutely support increased public transit for our hospitality workers.  In my discussions with constituents and stakeholders in the industry, I constantly hear how difficult a commute on public transit can be for those who work late shifts and must travel home at off-peak hours.  Inconsistency and delays result in people being late for work or other appointments, often opting to either take a costly cab or ride service, or to leave much earlier than they should, spending unnecessary time away from their families, due to poor on-time performance with bus routes.  I will support a comprehensive accounting of existing routes on RTA lines, and call for public input on creating new options to better serve our working communities.

 

Strumer: I support a greater expansion of the RTA.  It is shameful that in our great City we have the 53rd ranked mass transit system in the country.  The people who work as artists and musicians and within the 88,000 people of our hospitality and service industries, deserve to have better mass transit to get them to and from work safely and efficiently.  I give the expansion of a reliable mass transit system in New Orleans my full throated support.

A. ) 24 hour mass transit service

B.) Expanding the existing bus lines.

C.) Creating new bus lines.

D.) Providing more covered seating areas for waiting on bus lines.  

E.) Card swiping to remove the cash transactions, which can be much more dangerous.  

F.) Electric Buses to promote green energy choices, which are more reliable, more efficient, and less polluting than our current diesel busses.

 

Love:  I will enforce criteria for transit expansion investments that is based on

Reducing the travel time for commuters

Increasing the number of jobs workers can access within 30mins

Expanding routes across parish lines

I will work to use a local hotel occupancy tax that taxes the tourist not our citizens to provide funding for increasing the number of buses and routes. 

I will not support project like the multi-million-dollar Rampart Trolley Extension that only increased the property value for some politicians and their friends and actually reduced the number of jobs people could access. Any investment must demonstrate a clear and measurable impact on those who depend on it to earn a living.

 

Ben-Oluwole: While the City Council has little direct control over the RTA, I would use my position as councilmember from District B to advocate for more efficient use of RTA money, with more options for door-to-door service in areas or at times with limited service. For instance, this could mean coordination with Lyft or Uber, or an extension of the current RTA Lift Program for seniors.

Banks: Our culture bearers must be compensated fairly. I will work to insure that organizations and business that employ our musicians and other artists pay a living wage.   Bloom: I currently sit on the NOCCA board, where I have the pleasure of experiencing art and performance from youth in our vibrant city.  I pledge to support dedication of funding to programs for the arts among youth as well as adults who contribute to our culture. We should remember however that the best way to help our culture bearers to move beyond poverty to a comfortable living, is to ensure that they have adequate opportunities for steady work.  Funding campaigns to attract tourism is an important part of that, and one I will also work to maintain. I also favor educating tourists on how they can support local culture and will partner with tourism and hospitality groups as well as artists and coalitions, to further this goal.   Strumer: Tourism is one of the most important aspects of the City of New Orleans.  After the port of New Orleans, there is no other greater draw to our City.  Unfortunately, again the people who help create and maintain this environment in which we live and enjoy are too often overlooked but the people who own the establishments and take home the lion’s share of the profits.  There is nothing wrong with making money.  But I will vocally support, and encourage others to do the same, the businesses, clubs, and music venues that take the best care of the musicians and artists, which work in these establishments.    Love: I will create a local hotel occupancy tax (7%); that generates a new source of income from the tourism industry that can be used to fund support programs for those that are the nuts and bolts of the tourism industry, the reason tourist come here.   Ben-Oluwole: I believe we need to use more of that money to support our cultural economy by providing necessary services and good to our culture bearers. This would include health care, transportation, and access to housing. It could also come in the form of larger homestead exemptions, first right of refusal for new affordable rentals, mental health treatment, or even something as simple as free or reduced bus passes.

Banks: Our culture bearers must be compensated fairly. I will work to insure that organizations and business that employ our musicians and other artists pay a living wage.

 

Bloom: I currently sit on the NOCCA board, where I have the pleasure of experiencing art and performance from youth in our vibrant city.  I pledge to support dedication of funding to programs for the arts among youth as well as adults who contribute to our culture. We should remember however that the best way to help our culture bearers to move beyond poverty to a comfortable living, is to ensure that they have adequate opportunities for steady work.  Funding campaigns to attract tourism is an important part of that, and one I will also work to maintain. I also favor educating tourists on how they can support local culture and will partner with tourism and hospitality groups as well as artists and coalitions, to further this goal.

 

Strumer: Tourism is one of the most important aspects of the City of New Orleans.  After the port of New Orleans, there is no other greater draw to our City.  Unfortunately, again the people who help create and maintain this environment in which we live and enjoy are too often overlooked but the people who own the establishments and take home the lion’s share of the profits.  There is nothing wrong with making money.  But I will vocally support, and encourage others to do the same, the businesses, clubs, and music venues that take the best care of the musicians and artists, which work in these establishments. 

 

Love: I will create a local hotel occupancy tax (7%); that generates a new source of income from the tourism industry that can be used to fund support programs for those that are the nuts and bolts of the tourism industry, the reason tourist come here.

 

Ben-Oluwole: I believe we need to use more of that money to support our cultural economy by providing necessary services and good to our culture bearers. This would include health care, transportation, and access to housing. It could also come in the form of larger homestead exemptions, first right of refusal for new affordable rentals, mental health treatment, or even something as simple as free or reduced bus passes.

Ray: This fee inequity has been a part of my published campaign platform since it was released. I am well aware of the inadequate, if not seemingly arbitrary, fee structure. As a vital part of our culture, community, and economy, I will work with the next administration to restructure the parade permit fees to ensure our smaller, yet equally significant, Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs (who often have far less finances than Mardi Gras Krewes) are not paying more than they should.   Banks: I participate in the parades as a member of Zulu and I support a fair and equitable parade fees for our Social Aid and Pleasure clubs.   Bloom: Our Mardi Gras parade fees are based in law on the fact that Mardi Gras parades along the traditional routes create tremendous economic revenue for our city, and that Mardi Gras is a production of the city of New Orleans.  Second lines produced by Social Aid and Pleasure clubs, since they are productions by the individual organizations, must provide their own security in the form of paid NOPD officer details, while Mardi Gras parade security is provided by the city directly. I understand that these fees can be onerous for Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs.  I pledge to seek equitable solutions, and will welcome culture bearers, Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs, and the Social Aid and Pleasure Club Task Force to provide input and proposals to modify current processes for permitting and security.   Strumer: Large clubs should pay more for their permits.  It seems a simple solution.  If larger clubs require a greater draw on the City’s resources, then the larger clubs should pay more for a permit.   Love: I will first and foremost require full transparency.  All invoice must include details regarding number of officers, names of officers, time in 15min increments, distance of route in order to be valid. I will level the playing field by advocating that ALL second-lines be required to hire a set number of police/100 or 500 people and be charge per officer based on the number of people that actual come, not the number anticipated I will create a traditional second-line ordinance that provides clear definitions, guidelines and protections for this cultural backbone of New Orleans. We are not just Mardi Gras. Likewise, I will hold social club, Mardi Gras krewes, special event hosts, etc accountable for any violence by suspending and/or revoking second-line privileges temporarily or permanently in chronic situations.  I would also organizers criminal responsible if indicated. The tradition is being threatened because the bad actions of a few.   Ben-Oluwole: I would address this inequity by rectifying it. It’s ridiculous.

Ray: This fee inequity has been a part of my published campaign platform since it was released. I am well aware of the inadequate, if not seemingly arbitrary, fee structure. As a vital part of our culture, community, and economy, I will work with the next administration to restructure the parade permit fees to ensure our smaller, yet equally significant, Social Aid & Pleasure Clubs (who often have far less finances than Mardi Gras Krewes) are not paying more than they should.

 

Banks: I participate in the parades as a member of Zulu and I support a fair and equitable parade fees for our Social Aid and Pleasure clubs.

 

Bloom: Our Mardi Gras parade fees are based in law on the fact that Mardi Gras parades along the traditional routes create tremendous economic revenue for our city, and that Mardi Gras is a production of the city of New Orleans.  Second lines produced by Social Aid and Pleasure clubs, since they are productions by the individual organizations, must provide their own security in the form of paid NOPD officer details, while Mardi Gras parade security is provided by the city directly.

I understand that these fees can be onerous for Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs.  I pledge to seek equitable solutions, and will welcome culture bearers, Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs, and the Social Aid and Pleasure Club Task Force to provide input and proposals to modify current processes for permitting and security.

 

Strumer: Large clubs should pay more for their permits.  It seems a simple solution.  If larger clubs require a greater draw on the City’s resources, then the larger clubs should pay more for a permit.

 

Love: I will first and foremost require full transparency.  All invoice must include details regarding number of officers, names of officers, time in 15min increments, distance of route in order to be valid.

I will level the playing field by advocating that ALL second-lines be required to hire a set number of police/100 or 500 people and be charge per officer based on the number of people that actual come, not the number anticipated

I will create a traditional second-line ordinance that provides clear definitions, guidelines and protections for this cultural backbone of New Orleans. We are not just Mardi Gras.

Likewise, I will hold social club, Mardi Gras krewes, special event hosts, etc accountable for any violence by suspending and/or revoking second-line privileges temporarily or permanently in chronic situations.  I would also organizers criminal responsible if indicated. The tradition is being threatened because the bad actions of a few.

 

Ben-Oluwole: I would address this inequity by rectifying it. It’s ridiculous.

Ray: I do not fully support the Security Plan. As of today, the component I disagreed with the most (the 3 a.m. rule) has been pulled. I do not support the component that would plant trees and add “furniture” to Bourbon Street. I believe that is another affront to New Orleans and an effort to morph New Orleans into a more family-branded version of itself. I would keep the component that would require businesses on Bourbon to install CC- TV and supply their feed to NOPD.   Banks: I will review the data for the current plan to determine what has been effective and what has not. Security must be effective for the entire city, for our residents as well as tourists.   Bloom: I support anything that makes our streets safer.  If the presence of State Police in the French Quarter creates more confidence in public safety in the area, helps to decrease delays in response times, and works as a valuable partnership with NOPD 8th District officers, then I would support maintaining that limited partnership until such time as NOPD can fully operate and meet policing needs within the Quarter.  I am currently quite frustrated with the infrastructure component of the strategy, with the entry point and first block of Bourbon street being blocked with unending construction, especially when local entertainers and hospitality workers cannot easily access their work in the French Quarter. We must solve both our infrastructure and crime problems. It is imperative that both residents and visitors feel and are safe. We all have too much at stake.    Strumer: I do support an increase in security.  Larger numbers of police foot patrols and cameras are proven to help reduce crime.  Some reactive measures are necessary.  I would have a much larger percentage of the resources allocated from this plan to be used for proactive measures.  I want to increase youth programs for music and art for the children of New Orleans.  After school and weekend programs for children should be 100% funded by this Security Plan.  Let’s work together to prevent problems before they begin.  As it is now and it always has been.  Music brings the world together.     Love: I support a security plan. I don’t necessarily believe that the $40million dollar price tag is necessary.  In general, I would hold the entire plan up to the standard criteria of what is the measurable impact on the citizens of New Orleans.  Components of the security plan that do not achieve this I would amend or eliminate and components that achieve this I would keep and even expand if advantageous. Specifically, I like the "a rebranding of the French Quarter and Bourbon Street's image as a cultural destination”. For one, our culture is the main reason tourist come to New Orleans, two rebranding puts some of the responsibility on French Quarter businesses to create an image that is in line with New Orleans and its people and not just commercial Bourbon Street tourism. I don’t like the fact that it is predominately centered around French Quarter and not addressing many areas throughout the city that are affected by crime.  Again I would make sure that the investment of all components to this security plan fulfill the criteria of impacting New Orleanians citizens not just high tourist areas. Also I think there needs to be more of a focus on removing blight throughout the city and improving the cleanliness of the street “litter and dumping issue”.   Ben-Oluwole: One component I would keep is extended cameras in school zones; one component I would change is that I would allow mobile cameras only in areas with proven and persistent security challenges.

Ray: I do not fully support the Security Plan. As of today, the component I disagreed with the most (the 3 a.m. rule) has been pulled. I do not support the component that would plant trees and add “furniture” to Bourbon Street. I believe that is another affront to New Orleans and an effort to morph New Orleans into a more family-branded version of itself. I would keep the component that would require businesses on Bourbon to install CC- TV and supply their feed to NOPD.

 

Banks: I will review the data for the current plan to determine what has been effective and what has not. Security must be effective for the entire city, for our residents as well as tourists.

 

Bloom: I support anything that makes our streets safer.  If the presence of State Police in the French Quarter creates more confidence in public safety in the area, helps to decrease delays in response times, and works as a valuable partnership with NOPD 8th District officers, then I would support maintaining that limited partnership until such time as NOPD can fully operate and meet policing needs within the Quarter.  I am currently quite frustrated with the infrastructure component of the strategy, with the entry point and first block of Bourbon street being blocked with unending construction, especially when local entertainers and hospitality workers cannot easily access their work in the French Quarter. We must solve both our infrastructure and crime problems.

It is imperative that both residents and visitors feel and are safe. We all have too much at stake. 

 

Strumer: I do support an increase in security.  Larger numbers of police foot patrols and cameras are proven to help reduce crime.  Some reactive measures are necessary.  I would have a much larger percentage of the resources allocated from this plan to be used for proactive measures.  I want to increase youth programs for music and art for the children of New Orleans.  After school and weekend programs for children should be 100% funded by this Security Plan.  Let’s work together to prevent problems before they begin.  As it is now and it always has been.  Music brings the world together.  

 

Love: I support a security plan. I don’t necessarily believe that the $40million dollar price tag is necessary.  In general, I would hold the entire plan up to the standard criteria of what is the measurable impact on the citizens of New Orleans.  Components of the security plan that do not achieve this I would amend or eliminate and components that achieve this I would keep and even expand if advantageous.

Specifically, I like the "a rebranding of the French Quarter and Bourbon Street's image as a cultural destination”. For one, our culture is the main reason tourist come to New Orleans, two rebranding puts some of the responsibility on French Quarter businesses to create an image that is in line with New Orleans and its people and not just commercial Bourbon Street tourism.

I don’t like the fact that it is predominately centered around French Quarter and not addressing many areas throughout the city that are affected by crime.  Again I would make sure that the investment of all components to this security plan fulfill the criteria of impacting New Orleanians citizens not just high tourist areas. Also I think there needs to be more of a focus on removing blight throughout the city and improving the cleanliness of the street “litter and dumping issue”.

 

Ben-Oluwole: One component I would keep is extended cameras in school zones; one component I would change is that I would allow mobile cameras only in areas with proven and persistent security challenges.

Ray: Most neighborhood bars, music venues, and small cultural businesses have been in operation for a number of years and are, mostly, good neighbors. Oftentimes, problems and complaints arise when new neighbors move in and/or when developers want to see an establishment shuttered. Since we know these practices occur, any consideration of an emerging pattern of complaint must be duly fleshed out and independently investigated, before the City acts and impairs the business.   Banks: I will listen to the concerns of these businesses and work to insure that we do not inhibit the ability of those who work and perform to make a living.   Bloom: I will seek to ensure that proposed policies that affect cultural contributors, venue owners, and other stakeholders are debated in a public forum, to ensure that those who would be affected have a chance to give insight and input.  I will also do my part to ensure that existing laws are not disproportionately applied and levied against any single group or establishment, but instead are implemented fairly.  I also think it is important that local businesses do not have to worry about their buildings or the streets getting to them are flooded. We must address our drainage problems so that businesses can continue to thrive.   Strumer: I go to as many neighborhood bars, music venues, and cultural business as I can persona can.  Sometimes, more than I can, but I love them so much, I often choose live entertainment over Staying at home and binging on Netflix.   I am not sure what things I can do as your City Council representative.  But since my heart is with the music of New Orleans, I am sure with the input of those people who know this aspect o the City better than I do, we can come to a mutually acceptable and growing platform to increase the viability of our local venues together.  I have said it for years and years, “New Orleans is the music capital of the world.”  I intend to do everything in my power to continue to support every aspect of our claim.     Love: I will grant permanent non-conforming use to historic bars and music venues I will work to streamline the permitting process and remove the bureaucracy I will incentivize cover charge events to promote higher wages for entertainers I will proactively apply for grants that will help mitigate sound and noise in bars and music venues, giving priority to traditional and historic venues. Create a preservation fund, and request from Baton Rouge that our tourism tax money be allocated here to create subsidies that support local business (like employment subsidies which will also increase workers’ wages) and incentive local landlords (like the rent subsidies) to choice local businesses over national chains I will create ordinance that incentivize landlords to choose local business of national chains I will create a city-sponsored promotion of local and culturally significant businesses   Ben-Oluwole: One way I would support smaller businesses and venues is to not allow neighborhood organizations or new residents to demand change in zoning or city law or local culture to accommodate neighborhood gentrification. For instance, I am a fan of go-cups, even in the Bywater and a fan of second-lines, even when they forget to pick up their trash. By contributing to the uniqueness of our city, they give much more than they take from us, and we can not forget that.

Ray: Most neighborhood bars, music venues, and small cultural businesses have been in operation for a number of years and are, mostly, good neighbors. Oftentimes, problems and complaints arise when new neighbors move in and/or when developers want to see an establishment shuttered. Since we know these practices occur, any consideration of an emerging pattern of complaint must be duly fleshed out and independently investigated, before the City acts and impairs the business.

 

Banks: I will listen to the concerns of these businesses and work to insure that we do not inhibit the ability of those who work and perform to make a living.

 

Bloom: I will seek to ensure that proposed policies that affect cultural contributors, venue owners, and other stakeholders are debated in a public forum, to ensure that those who would be affected have a chance to give insight and input.  I will also do my part to ensure that existing laws are not disproportionately applied and levied against any single group or establishment, but instead are implemented fairly. 

I also think it is important that local businesses do not have to worry about their buildings or the streets getting to them are flooded. We must address our drainage problems so that businesses can continue to thrive.

 

Strumer: I go to as many neighborhood bars, music venues, and cultural business as I can persona can.  Sometimes, more than I can, but I love them so much, I often choose live entertainment over Staying at home and binging on Netflix.   I am not sure what things I can do as your City Council representative.  But since my heart is with the music of New Orleans, I am sure with the input of those people who know this aspect o the City better than I do, we can come to a mutually acceptable and growing platform to increase the viability of our local venues together.  I have said it for years and years, “New Orleans is the music capital of the world.”  I intend to do everything in my power to continue to support every aspect of our claim.  

 

Love:

I will grant permanent non-conforming use to historic bars and music venues

I will work to streamline the permitting process and remove the bureaucracy

I will incentivize cover charge events to promote higher wages for entertainers

I will proactively apply for grants that will help mitigate sound and noise in bars and music venues, giving priority to traditional and historic venues.

Create a preservation fund, and request from Baton Rouge that our tourism tax money be allocated here to create subsidies that support local business (like employment subsidies which will also increase workers’ wages) and incentive local landlords (like the rent subsidies) to choice local businesses over national chains

I will create ordinance that incentivize landlords to choose local business of national chains

I will create a city-sponsored promotion of local and culturally significant businesses

 

Ben-Oluwole: One way I would support smaller businesses and venues is to not allow neighborhood organizations or new residents to demand change in zoning or city law or local culture to accommodate neighborhood gentrification. For instance, I am a fan of go-cups, even in the Bywater and a fan of second-lines, even when they forget to pick up their trash. By contributing to the uniqueness of our city, they give much more than they take from us, and we can not forget that.

Ray: Yes   Banks: Yes   Bloom: I would remove the 8pm curfew, butalsowould advocate a more common-sense policy on noise that does not punish street musicians but also allows for some reasonable accommodations during weekday evenings, to create an environment that honors performers and also respects neighbors.   Strumer: Yes, I support the removal of a curfew for street musicians.  Musicians and a curfew?  Who ever came up with this idea doesn’t know musicians well at all.     Love: No. I think this is a community by community decision that should be decided by involved parties in each community.  I do not support in wide spread ban or removal of regulations.  These types of issues go to the heart of “what is defined as a nuisance and what is part of individual neighborhood culture”.  I feel strongly that this type of regulation will serve New Orleans best if applied neighborhood by neighborhood where in community organization, performer representatives, and neighborhood associations are given voting rights.   Ben-Oluwole: Yes

Ray: Yes

 

Banks: Yes

 

Bloom: I would remove the 8pm curfew, butalsowould advocate a more common-sense policy on noise that does not punish street musicians but also allows for some reasonable accommodations during weekday evenings, to create an environment that honors performers and also respects neighbors.

 

Strumer: Yes, I support the removal of a curfew for street musicians.  Musicians and a curfew?  Who ever came up with this idea doesn’t know musicians well at all.  

 

Love: No. I think this is a community by community decision that should be decided by involved parties in each community.  I do not support in wide spread ban or removal of regulations.  These types of issues go to the heart of “what is defined as a nuisance and what is part of individual neighborhood culture”.  I feel strongly that this type of regulation will serve New Orleans best if applied neighborhood by neighborhood where in community organization, performer representatives, and neighborhood associations are given voting rights.

 

Ben-Oluwole: Yes

Ray: As a part of my proposed Cultural Arts Trust Fund, I envision securing and dedicating funds that will nurture, preserve, and pass along New Orleans cultural and performing arts – in all genres. I envision funding and programming for true New Orleans culture – in tandem.   Banks: I will work in conjunction with the various entities to determine what policies may need to be added or revised to support our cultural community. Together we can institute effective policies that will enhance our values.   Bloom: I pledge to have an open door for community members and representatives to weigh in on policy decisions.  Our diverse culture, music, performers, and all creative enterprises should be celebrated, and I am ready to implement innovative ideas to support those in arts and entertainment.   Strumer: I love music.  I love art and the arts.   But I am not going to claim an equal love of all music and all art.  Friends have told me on more than one occasion that I’m caught in a Classic Rock black hole that only enjoys some hip-hop, country-western, reggae and R&B.  I don’t agree with that assessment, but it has been said I have an open mind when it comes to art and even more so as it pertains to music.  Every form is viable.  I say, “Introduce me to it, and let me decide.”  I’ll always love The Grateful Dead, but I can learn some new tunes as well.   Again, Music brings the world together.    Love: I will make sure city run public spaces and cultural centers are accessible to culture bearers to host cultural programming in the community. I will work towards finding a balance and identifying opportunity both in residential and commercial areas to promote cultural uses, events and developments that strengthen neighborhoods I will promote the 19 cultural product districts in New Orleans I will ensure that zoning codes, performance standards and city ordinances are inclusive and proactive in preserving cultural integrity of our community and its people I will involve and advocate for giving community organizations and neighborhood associations voting rights for establishing neighborhood by neighborhood definitions of quality of life regulations such as nuisances. I not only support but will proactively advocate for a living culture preservation program   Ben-Oluwole: I will have a staff member to specifically liaise with the culture bearers in District B to ensure they have access to my office and we have a clear line of communication. I very much look forward to working with them to create or strengthen policies that reflect and even amplify our shared cultural values.

Ray: As a part of my proposed Cultural Arts Trust Fund, I envision securing and dedicating funds that will nurture, preserve, and pass along New Orleans cultural and performing arts – in all genres. I envision funding and programming for true New Orleans culture – in tandem.

 

Banks: I will work in conjunction with the various entities to determine what policies may need to be added or revised to support our cultural community. Together we can institute effective policies that will enhance our values.

 

Bloom: I pledge to have an open door for community members and representatives to weigh in on policy decisions.  Our diverse culture, music, performers, and all creative enterprises should be celebrated, and I am ready to implement innovative ideas to support those in arts and entertainment.

 

Strumer: I love music.  I love art and the arts.   But I am not going to claim an equal love of all music and all art.  Friends have told me on more than one occasion that I’m caught in a Classic Rock black hole that only enjoys some hip-hop, country-western, reggae and R&B.  I don’t agree with that assessment, but it has been said I have an open mind when it comes to art and even more so as it pertains to music.  Every form is viable.  I say, “Introduce me to it, and let me decide.”  I’ll always love The Grateful Dead, but I can learn some new tunes as well.   Again, Music brings the world together. 

 

Love:

I will make sure city run public spaces and cultural centers are accessible to culture bearers to host cultural programming in the community.

I will work towards finding a balance and identifying opportunity both in residential and commercial areas to promote cultural uses, events and developments that strengthen neighborhoods

I will promote the 19 cultural product districts in New Orleans

I will ensure that zoning codes, performance standards and city ordinances are inclusive and proactive in preserving cultural integrity of our community and its people

I will involve and advocate for giving community organizations and neighborhood associations voting rights for establishing neighborhood by neighborhood definitions of quality of life regulations such as nuisances.

I not only support but will proactively advocate for a living culture preservation program

 

Ben-Oluwole: I will have a staff member to specifically liaise with the culture bearers in District B to ensure they have access to my office and we have a clear line of communication. I very much look forward to working with them to create or strengthen policies that reflect and even amplify our shared cultural values.

Ray: As a part of my call for “holistic approaches” to public safety, and specific resources for New Orleans youth and children, I have called for cultural arts trainings to be supported by the City, in addition to city-supported recreational programs.   Banks: All of the stakeholders including tourism, business, government, labor and education must come together to create realistic opportunities for our youth so that crime is an option they never consider.  We can enhance programs at NORD such as theater, music lessons and dance to provide programs that will make our youth aware of their culture. Such programs can also employ our culture bearers and allow them to pass on the culture and traditions.   Bloom: As a two term Orleans Parish School Board Member, I recognize the important role education of every kind can play in crime reduction and overall increase in quality of life. I will seek to promote education and youth empowerment throughout my work as councilman, including advocating for youth cultural programming and seeking to expand funding, publicity, and partnerships for NORDC programs to include music, arts, and performance. I will advocate for the continued expansion of arts and cultural programming in our schools. Cultural activities also provide economic development and jobs. The opportunities for employment and extra income can also benefit our youth and encourage continued development of our cultural heritage.      Strumer: I fully support opening access to music and the arts to the children of New Orleans.  Let’s introduce children to the musicians on a personal and teacher/student level.  Let’s show children from where the music comes and who are the people who make this music.  Let’s make learning music a much anticipated reward for good work in school and citizenship in our communities.  As a teacher, I know how important the presentation of a lesson is to the understanding and growth of the message.  I support the creation of more and the maintenance of the current programs for the children of our City.   Love:  I will advocate for and support cultural cooperatives, even providing use of city owned property, renovation of blighted city owned property to support cultural based community outreach and permanent rehearsal and community space for cultural activities   Ben-Oluwole: Again, I will have a staff member to specifically liaise with the culture bearers in District B to ensure their ideas are heard, their projects are supported, and that we can work together to expand their reach into schools, community centers, and even NORDC where appropriate. In other words, I would love to make sure they have jobs sharing their expertise with the broader community.

Ray: As a part of my call for “holistic approaches” to public safety, and specific resources for New Orleans youth and children, I have called for cultural arts trainings to be supported by the City, in addition to city-supported recreational programs.

 

Banks: All of the stakeholders including tourism, business, government, labor and education must come together to create realistic opportunities for our youth so that crime is an option they never consider.  We can enhance programs at NORD such as theater, music lessons and dance to provide programs that will make our youth aware of their culture. Such programs can also employ our culture bearers and allow them to pass on the culture and traditions.

 

Bloom: As a two term Orleans Parish School Board Member, I recognize the important role education of every kind can play in crime reduction and overall increase in quality of life. I will seek to promote education and youth empowerment throughout my work as councilman, including advocating for youth cultural programming and seeking to expand funding, publicity, and partnerships for NORDC programs to include music, arts, and performance. I will advocate for the continued expansion of arts and cultural programming in our schools. Cultural activities also provide economic development and jobs. The opportunities for employment and extra income can also benefit our youth and encourage continued development of our cultural heritage.   

 

Strumer: I fully support opening access to music and the arts to the children of New Orleans.  Let’s introduce children to the musicians on a personal and teacher/student level.  Let’s show children from where the music comes and who are the people who make this music.  Let’s make learning music a much anticipated reward for good work in school and citizenship in our communities.  As a teacher, I know how important the presentation of a lesson is to the understanding and growth of the message.  I support the creation of more and the maintenance of the current programs for the children of our City.

 

Love:  I will advocate for and support cultural cooperatives, even providing use of city owned property, renovation of blighted city owned property to support cultural based community outreach and permanent rehearsal and community space for cultural activities

 

Ben-Oluwole: Again, I will have a staff member to specifically liaise with the culture bearers in District B to ensure their ideas are heard, their projects are supported, and that we can work together to expand their reach into schools, community centers, and even NORDC where appropriate. In other words, I would love to make sure they have jobs sharing their expertise with the broader community.

Ray:  See questions 9 & 10; for more information visit http://timothydavidray.com/protecting-new-orleans-culture/   Banks: The City Council has no direct involvement in education but does have the power to demand that all of the stakeholders come together to create paths that our youth can take. We must support and insure that programs for the arts are included in the school curriculums   Bloom: In addition to more formal programming for youths such as arts and music education in our schools and community programming, our culture also depends on participation in neighborhood cultural groups like Mardi Gras Indians, neighborhood musicians and bands, and Social Aid and Pleasure clubs.  To support participation inneighborhood based groups, it is important to maintain their visibility and recognition as vital community cultural touchstones.  I will be a champion of formal and informal cultural traditions, and will again seek input from coalitions like the Social Aid and Pleasure Club Task Force, Mardi Gras Indian Council, MACCNO, and other associations that bring together culture bearers, to seek ways to continue their work and identify ways to empower young people to participate in these traditions.   Strumer: I support fully funding our schools with complete access to music and the arts.   Love: I will work on creating a partnership between the local musicians and the public-school system as well as the after-school programs to keep music in our schools and keep musicians employed in this city.  Having a cultural program that provides instruction and experience in music, performing arts and literary arts is crucial to both our city and our children.  The “arts” collectively are often the first programs cut during budget crisis. They are often lost in areas plagued by chronic budget issues, such as New Orleans.  Also, “starving arts” so to speak, cannot only benefit from a new source of reliable income through this partnership they can also diffuse their cultural values/attributes into the next generation.   Ben-Oluwole: For one, I would actually like to see NORDC provide more after school programs specifically utilizing the talent and expertise of musicians and other culture bearers.

Ray:  See questions 9 & 10; for more information visit http://timothydavidray.com/protecting-new-orleans-culture/

 

Banks: The City Council has no direct involvement in education but does have the power to demand that all of the stakeholders come together to create paths that our youth can take. We must support and insure that programs for the arts are included in the school curriculums

 

Bloom: In addition to more formal programming for youths such as arts and music education in our schools and community programming, our culture also depends on participation in neighborhood cultural groups like Mardi Gras Indians, neighborhood musicians and bands, and Social Aid and Pleasure clubs.  To support participation inneighborhood based groups, it is important to maintain their visibility and recognition as vital community cultural touchstones.  I will be a champion of formal and informal cultural traditions, and will again seek input from coalitions like the Social Aid and Pleasure Club Task Force, Mardi Gras Indian Council, MACCNO, and other associations that bring together culture bearers, to seek ways to continue their work and identify ways to empower young people to participate in these traditions.

 

Strumer: I support fully funding our schools with complete access to music and the arts.

 

Love: I will work on creating a partnership between the local musicians and the public-school system as well as the after-school programs to keep music in our schools and keep musicians employed in this city.  Having a cultural program that provides instruction and experience in music, performing arts and literary arts is crucial to both our city and our children.  The “arts” collectively are often the first programs cut during budget crisis. They are often lost in areas plagued by chronic budget issues, such as New Orleans.  Also, “starving arts” so to speak, cannot only benefit from a new source of reliable income through this partnership they can also diffuse their cultural values/attributes into the next generation.

 

Ben-Oluwole: For one, I would actually like to see NORDC provide more after school programs specifically utilizing the talent and expertise of musicians and other culture bearers.

Ray: Yes. These zones were proposed before and I supported it. They should already be in place as they are in others cities.   Banks: Yes   Bloom: Yes, where it is feasible to do so.   Strumer: Yes, I do support creating priority loading and unloading zones.  Generally, musicians have to hump a lot of gear to their respective gigs.  I think and support the idea that it should be easier to off load and load this gear before and after the gigs.  Watching friends hump their gear and often being recruited to help with same, and having the long trek to cars blocks away, late night, exhausted and with pockets full of cash, well maybe not pockets as in more than one, and maybe not full of cash, but definitely with cash, deep into the night serves to put my friends and friends I haven’t met in a situation that is more likely to result in a number of negative scenarios, not the least of which would have to be robbery and theft.   Let’s have a quick, two hour window for late afternoon loading in and late evening loading out.  If it works well let’s keep it.  And when a tweak needs to happen, then let’s address that as grown ups too.  We can make this happen.   The problems facing New Orleans are not insoluble.  We are not trying to make men into mushrooms, or turn lead into gold.  Other places have faced these challenges and mastered them.   This is New Orleans.  We can do anything we put our minds to accomplish.  We turned a swamp into the music capital of the world.  And as you know, Music bring the world together.     Love: In general, yes.  As with any regulation, their needs to be clearly defined and outline terms in order to prevent abuse that typically is the root of most contention in communities.   Ben-Oluwole: Absolutely.

Ray: Yes. These zones were proposed before and I supported it. They should already be in place as they are in others cities.

 

Banks: Yes

 

Bloom: Yes, where it is feasible to do so.

 

Strumer: Yes, I do support creating priority loading and unloading zones.  Generally, musicians have to hump a lot of gear to their respective gigs.  I think and support the idea that it should be easier to off load and load this gear before and after the gigs.  Watching friends hump their gear and often being recruited to help with same, and having the long trek to cars blocks away, late night, exhausted and with pockets full of cash, well maybe not pockets as in more than one, and maybe not full of cash, but definitely with cash, deep into the night serves to put my friends and friends I haven’t met in a situation that is more likely to result in a number of negative scenarios, not the least of which would have to be robbery and theft.   Let’s have a quick, two hour window for late afternoon loading in and late evening loading out.  If it works well let’s keep it.  And when a tweak needs to happen, then let’s address that as grown ups too.  We can make this happen.  

The problems facing New Orleans are not insoluble.  We are not trying to make men into mushrooms, or turn lead into gold.  Other places have faced these challenges and mastered them.   This is New Orleans.  We can do anything we put our minds to accomplish.  We turned a swamp into the music capital of the world.  And as you know, Music bring the world together.  

 

Love: In general, yes.  As with any regulation, their needs to be clearly defined and outline terms in order to prevent abuse that typically is the root of most contention in communities.

 

Ben-Oluwole: Absolutely.