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DISTRICT A

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Aylin Maklansky

Tilman Hardy

Dan Ring

Toyia Washington-Kendrick

 

ANSWERS BY QUESTION

Maklansky: A cultural bearer is an individual or group that practices arts and traditions that express a community's traditional values, aesthetics, and needs through this work. Community driven criteria should apply.   Hardy: Wikipedia defines culture bearer as “any individual, especially a migrant, who carries, and thus diffuses, cultural values and traits between societies”. It further states, “The role of culture bearers is particularly important within those cultures undergoing transition or experiencing threat from outside the culture”.   I believe that most humans are culture bearers, but rarely identify as such—perhaps because many people in society do not understand the role they play in preserving, changing, and creating culture. The people who do understand the role(s) they play, seem to develop more intentionality behind their actions—such as Colin Kaepernick, Barack Obama, and John McCain. There is also cultural appropriation, which is lead by culture bearers who have created and maintained a culture of misappropriating others’ cultural identity and intellectual property.   Ring: I define the term culture bearer as someone, mainly indigenous but not strictly, that carries the culture of a region or a group from generation to generation. The criteria I use to determine to whom the term applies is one that a person or group who keeps a tradition alive. For instance groups such as  Mardi Gras Indians, Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs are clear cut examples. Indigenous to New Orleans, carrying the tradition of parading that is passed through generations or creating social mores of how a group interacts within the community. Some however are not as clear cut I believe. Groups like the New Orleans Musicians Clinic or Sweet Home New Orleans, while not directly involved in the act of parading or passing on the traditions of the benevolent work done by the SAPCs, assist in the continuity of the particular groups. So that to can be, in my opinion, bearing the culture.   Washington-Kendrick: "Culture bearer,” to me, implies a person who has intentionally encompassed culture and is transmitting and transferring it to others. How invested is the individual in our culture, what role they play in the culture, how are they educating others and to what degree are they doing it. 

Maklansky: A cultural bearer is an individual or group that practices arts and traditions that express a community's traditional values, aesthetics, and needs through this work. Community driven criteria should apply.

 

Hardy: Wikipedia defines culture bearer as “any individual, especially a migrant, who carries, and thus diffuses, cultural values and traits between societies”. It further states, “The role of culture bearers is particularly important within those cultures undergoing transition or experiencing threat from outside the culture”.  

I believe that most humans are culture bearers, but rarely identify as such—perhaps because many people in society do not understand the role they play in preserving, changing, and creating culture. The people who do understand the role(s) they play, seem to develop more intentionality behind their actions—such as Colin Kaepernick, Barack Obama, and John McCain.

There is also cultural appropriation, which is lead by culture bearers who have created and maintained a culture of misappropriating others’ cultural identity and intellectual property.

 

Ring: I define the term culture bearer as someone, mainly indigenous but not strictly, that carries the culture of a region or a group from generation to generation. The criteria I use to determine to whom the term applies is one that a person or group who keeps a tradition alive. For instance groups such as  Mardi Gras Indians, Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs are clear cut examples. Indigenous to New Orleans, carrying the tradition of parading that is passed through generations or creating social mores of how a group interacts within the community. Some however are not as clear cut I believe. Groups like the New Orleans Musicians Clinic or Sweet Home New Orleans, while not directly involved in the act of parading or passing on the traditions of the benevolent work done by the SAPCs, assist in the continuity of the particular groups. So that to can be, in my opinion, bearing the culture.

 

Washington-Kendrick: "Culture bearer,” to me, implies a person who has intentionally encompassed culture and is transmitting and transferring it to others. How invested is the individual in our culture, what role they play in the culture, how are they educating others and to what degree are they doing it. 

Maklansky: Property values and housing costs are linked to many issues, including market trends, housing supply, and the prevailing wage in the area. I will ensure that State and Federal housing programs are maximized and that leverage our resources to incentivize the supply of affordable housing. When new units are constructed, I will pursue long-term commitments for affordability. The Council can impact affordable housing through zoning by incentivizing the building of multi-family and multi-income housing where appropriate, built with quality construction and design, as well as through supporting home ownership programs. Additionally, it is imperative that the Short-Term Rental ordinance is enforced to ensure that the character of our communities is protected.   Hardy: I support inclusionary zoning through the expansion of the Smart Housing Mix Ordinance. I believe that every neighborhood in our city should share the responsibility of providing affordable housing to our most vulnerable residents. Considering that we have a 30,000 unit affordable housing shortage and 40,000+ blighted units of property, I will ensure that all blighted property is sold or otherwise assigned to individuals and agencies who have the capacity to transform them into affordable homes and businesses. I have proposed that we grow our $1.5MIL loan pool for Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) to $150MIL, with a priority on Tourism, Trade, and Technology, all of which affect the music industry. I have also proposed that the $200MIL+ surplus held by the Morial Convention Center be used to provide housing to low income service industry workers, musicians, and others who support our conventions and tourism industry.   Ring: One of my first acts will be to work on a plan to abolish the current short term rental law and work to a more equitable law which at least minimizes, and at best eliminates, whole house rentals. The current law motivates gentrification, cultural displacement and exorbitant rents and mortgages for those houses that are in the path of the STR deluge. By motivating property owners and builders to work with the city to create an affordable housing plan for all of New Orleans we can create a culture of affordable homeownership and rentals for those New Orleanians being forced out of neighborhoods where generations of their family lived worked and played.   Washington-Kendrick: Incentivize, Incentivize, Incentivize for new developers, old developers and landlords alike. For the new developers making sure they set aside a percentage of their housing units, for affordable housing for low income renters. Ensure those renters who have been in those neighborhoods where gentrification is growing, that landlords will receive the necessary support to enable them to keep those tenants in those houses.

Maklansky: Property values and housing costs are linked to many issues, including market trends, housing supply, and the prevailing wage in the area. I will ensure that State and Federal housing programs are maximized and that leverage our resources to incentivize the supply of affordable housing. When new units are constructed, I will pursue long-term commitments for affordability. The Council can impact affordable housing through zoning by incentivizing the building of multi-family and multi-income housing where appropriate, built with quality construction and design, as well as through supporting home ownership programs. Additionally, it is imperative that the Short-Term Rental ordinance is enforced to ensure that the character of our communities is protected.

 

Hardy: I support inclusionary zoning through the expansion of the Smart Housing Mix Ordinance. I believe that every neighborhood in our city should share the responsibility of providing affordable housing to our most vulnerable residents.

Considering that we have a 30,000 unit affordable housing shortage and 40,000+ blighted units of property, I will ensure that all blighted property is sold or otherwise assigned to individuals and agencies who have the capacity to transform them into affordable homes and businesses.

I have proposed that we grow our $1.5MIL loan pool for Disadvantaged Business Enterprises (DBEs) to $150MIL, with a priority on Tourism, Trade, and Technology, all of which affect the music industry.

I have also proposed that the $200MIL+ surplus held by the Morial Convention Center be used to provide housing to low income service industry workers, musicians, and others who support our conventions and tourism industry.

 

Ring: One of my first acts will be to work on a plan to abolish the current short term rental law and work to a more equitable law which at least minimizes, and at best eliminates, whole house rentals. The current law motivates gentrification, cultural displacement and exorbitant rents and mortgages for those houses that are in the path of the STR deluge. By motivating property owners and builders to work with the city to create an affordable housing plan for all of New Orleans we can create a culture of affordable homeownership and rentals for those New Orleanians being forced out of neighborhoods where generations of their family lived worked and played.

 

Washington-Kendrick: Incentivize, Incentivize, Incentivize for new developers, old developers and landlords alike. For the new developers making sure they set aside a percentage of their housing units, for affordable housing for low income renters. Ensure those renters who have been in those neighborhoods where gentrification is growing, that landlords will receive the necessary support to enable them to keep those tenants in those houses.

Maklansky: I will advocate for someone with transportation expertise to be appointed to City Planning Commission. On the Council, I will push for a more collaborative approach on a regional level, so that we can work with State and Federal officials to maximize the opportunities for expanding transportation infrastructure throughout the City. I believe we need to look at all innovative options for infrastructure and partner with the ride sharing economy and other new technologies to increase accessibility for all of our communities, particularly those who are underserved. Above all, I will seek to achieve the goals of New Orleans’ Master Plan to have livable, walkable communities.   Hardy: New Orleans needs to make sure that travel times on public transportation are reduced to the lowest in the country, and indeed the world. I will support a feasibility study and action plan for securing necessary resources to reach those goals. We also need to make sure that our App streams bus and streetcar locations in real time.   Ring: I will work with transit advocacy groups such as Ride Nola to work with the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority(NORTA) and its executive director to continue to develop more bus lines from the outer reaches of the city to the core. I will also work on making sure the Transdev is not renewed as the contract holder for the next contract. Bringing the transit situation under the purview of a city-run entity at the local level, beholden to the citizens of New Orleans not shareholders, will bring more oversight and positive results than currently being seen. I will also work with these groups to work with major employers such as Ochsner, the hotel and service industry and large corporations such as Entergy to offer reduced fare options to their employees. By sharing the cost of transportation, these groups will become stakeholders in the transportation piece of getting people to the job.   Washington-Kendrick: Conduct a feasibility assessment working along with RIDE and RTA to make sure those citizens are able to get to their destinations in a timely manner. Also making sure there are adequate buses on each line and citizen are aware of the bus schedules.

Maklansky: I will advocate for someone with transportation expertise to be appointed to City Planning Commission. On the Council, I will push for a more collaborative approach on a regional level, so that we can work with State and Federal officials to maximize the opportunities for expanding transportation infrastructure throughout the City. I believe we need to look at all innovative options for infrastructure and partner with the ride sharing economy and other new technologies to increase accessibility for all of our communities, particularly those who are underserved. Above all, I will seek to achieve the goals of New Orleans’ Master Plan to have livable, walkable communities.

 

Hardy: New Orleans needs to make sure that travel times on public transportation are reduced to the lowest in the country, and indeed the world. I will support a feasibility study and action plan for securing necessary resources to reach those goals.

We also need to make sure that our App streams bus and streetcar locations in real time.

 

Ring: I will work with transit advocacy groups such as Ride Nola to work with the New Orleans Regional Transit Authority(NORTA) and its executive director to continue to develop more bus lines from the outer reaches of the city to the core. I will also work on making sure the Transdev is not renewed as the contract holder for the next contract. Bringing the transit situation under the purview of a city-run entity at the local level, beholden to the citizens of New Orleans not shareholders, will bring more oversight and positive results than currently being seen. I will also work with these groups to work with major employers such as Ochsner, the hotel and service industry and large corporations such as Entergy to offer reduced fare options to their employees. By sharing the cost of transportation, these groups will become stakeholders in the transportation piece of getting people to the job.

 

Washington-Kendrick: Conduct a feasibility assessment working along with RIDE and RTA to make sure those citizens are able to get to their destinations in a timely manner. Also making sure there are adequate buses on each line and citizen are aware of the bus schedules.

Maklansky: It is not acceptable for our culture bearers to be struggling when they are the driving force for tourism. When I am on the Council, I will ask tourism and cultural industry leaders to come together to propose a plan to give more support to the musicians, artists and culture bearers. I will propose to establish an advisory committee on culture and community to advise the City Council, very similar to the Environmental Advisory Committee I helped established while serving as the lead legislative staffer for Councilwoman Nadine Ramsey. While working on behalf of District C, I developed an excellent working relationship with MACCNO, with a consistent record of fighting for the needs of our artists, musicians, and craftsman, and I will continue to do so as the District A Councilperson.   Hardy: Many artists, promoters, and cultural centers rely on other individuals and organizations to underwrite capital developments, events and ad campaigns. This means many of them will have less control over branding and profits. I believe that the DBE Loan pool and the Convention Center surplus are great resources to tap for underwriting artists and promoters directly. I believe that cooperatives and unions should also have access to these funds.   Ring: The first place to look is at the Morial Convention Center. The windfall that is garnered while attendance continues to drop and improvements to the MCC are not done as planned is staggering. By taking even a small amount of this surplus, we could work to improve infrastructure, develop more affordable housing, obtain more buses to improve route frequency. All of these things lend themselves to assisting our culture bearers and cultural images that motivate people to flock to New Orleans.   Washington-Kendrick: It would take the art council and musicians union to get more involved in mandating their mission. These organizations are in place for servicing and protecting the culture bears, which they should fight for obtaining funds to have musicians to sign up to perform. Granted, musicians go out on their own to the French Quarters/Market and perform, but if the IRS would sanction the musicians with an estimated amount on "Tips" accumulated. What may need to happen is a little training and dialogue with the two parties to set culture bears and art council to find policies and more protect for the artist intellectual property for the right dividends.

Maklansky: It is not acceptable for our culture bearers to be struggling when they are the driving force for tourism. When I am on the Council, I will ask tourism and cultural industry leaders to come together to propose a plan to give more support to the musicians, artists and culture bearers. I will propose to establish an advisory committee on culture and community to advise the City Council, very similar to the Environmental Advisory Committee I helped established while serving as the lead legislative staffer for Councilwoman Nadine Ramsey. While working on behalf of District C, I developed an excellent working relationship with MACCNO, with a consistent record of fighting for the needs of our artists, musicians, and craftsman, and I will continue to do so as the District A Councilperson.

 

Hardy: Many artists, promoters, and cultural centers rely on other individuals and organizations to underwrite capital developments, events and ad campaigns. This means many of them will have less control over branding and profits.

I believe that the DBE Loan pool and the Convention Center surplus are great resources to tap for underwriting artists and promoters directly. I believe that

cooperatives and unions should also have access to these funds.

 

Ring: The first place to look is at the Morial Convention Center. The windfall that is garnered while attendance continues to drop and improvements to the MCC are not done as planned is staggering. By taking even a small amount of this surplus, we could work to improve infrastructure, develop more affordable housing, obtain more buses to improve route frequency. All of these things lend themselves to assisting our culture bearers and cultural images that motivate people to flock to New Orleans.

 

Washington-Kendrick: It would take the art council and musicians union to get more involved in mandating their mission. These organizations are in place for servicing and protecting the culture bears, which they should fight for obtaining funds to have musicians to sign up to perform.

Granted, musicians go out on their own to the French Quarters/Market and perform, but if the IRS would sanction the musicians with an estimated amount on "Tips" accumulated. What may need to happen is a little training and dialogue with the two parties to set culture bears and art council to find policies and more protect for the artist intellectual property for the right dividends.

Maklansky: As you know the fee structures were recently changed by the Council. I believe we need to revisit the fee structure and make sure the framework is equitable and fair.   Hardy: I believe that a portion of the traffic camera fees, money acquired from many of our cultural Foundations, and a portion of the Convention Center Surplus should underwrite the historic cultural events in our City.   Ring: I will call for a review of the fee structure. While some parades do not need as much security as SAPC second lines, the fees and the administration of the fees are not equally reported by the city. It also seems that the City is taking on a lot of cost in the name of Mardi Gras. While we can all agree it is a city promoted event, we can also make the argument that so too should second lines be promoted. This mitigates the argument of free police for Mardi Gras krewes.   Washington-Kendrick: The first line of equity would be a specific monetary scale that breaks down what the fees are for and why they are there. The Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs fees would be equal to or less than Parade fees because second lines have a time limit to be off the streets of New Orleans while Mardi Gras parades have no time limit. Equity must start with Good Government and we see that this is not by any means Good Government.

Maklansky: As you know the fee structures were recently changed by the Council. I believe we need to revisit the fee structure and make sure the framework is equitable and fair.

 

Hardy: I believe that a portion of the traffic camera fees, money acquired from many of our cultural Foundations, and a portion of the Convention Center Surplus should underwrite the historic cultural events in our City.

 

Ring: I will call for a review of the fee structure. While some parades do not need as much security as SAPC second lines, the fees and the administration of the fees are not equally reported by the city. It also seems that the City is taking on a lot of cost in the name of Mardi Gras. While we can all agree it is a city promoted event, we can also make the argument that so too should second lines be promoted. This mitigates the argument of free police for Mardi Gras krewes.

 

Washington-Kendrick: The first line of equity would be a specific monetary scale that breaks down what the fees are for and why they are there. The Social Aid and Pleasure Clubs fees would be equal to or less than Parade fees because second lines have a time limit to be off the streets of New Orleans while Mardi Gras parades have no time limit. Equity must start with Good Government and we see that this is not by any means Good Government.

Maklansky: We must do whatever we can to ensure the security of our City, including the French quarter and high traffic areas. I am not in support of closing venues early or any measure that would disrupt the civil liberties of our tourists, residents, or performers or disrupt our culture. Increased police presence, live monitoring, and community policing that is educated on our cultural laws (like through MACCNOs street performance guide) are all measures I support in order to reduce the opportunities to commit crime. Providing safe venues, loading areas and pathways is critical to this plan.   Hardy: I support some aspects of the plan but not others. I would keep the LED lighting and ask for fiber-optics and wifi as the technology will pay for itself. I would not have paid for the barricades and do not support the curfew.   Ring: I support a portion of it. As an advocate of community policing, I believe at least a part of that 40 million dollars can be better spent in other areas of the budget. The main component that I would keep is the crime cameras. I believe this is a technological benefit that can help police in researching a crime. The piece I would not keep is the closure of doors on Bourbon Street at 3AM. I don’t see any point in it. I do not think it will mitigate crime. I do think it will force additional enforcement that will take away from the overall security of the French Quarter.   Washington-Kendrick: No, I do not support the $40 million dollar Security plan in its entirety. While I would keep the surveillance cameras for major hot spots in the city and the 300 police cars. I would not "pedestrianize" the 200 to the 800 block of the French Quarters. I feel like we should give attention to other pressing needs in other neighborhoods of the city.

Maklansky: We must do whatever we can to ensure the security of our City, including the French quarter and high traffic areas. I am not in support of closing venues early or any measure that would disrupt the civil liberties of our tourists, residents, or performers or disrupt our culture. Increased police presence, live monitoring, and community policing that is educated on our cultural laws (like through MACCNOs street performance guide) are all measures I support in order to reduce the opportunities to commit crime. Providing safe venues, loading areas and pathways is critical to this plan.

 

Hardy: I support some aspects of the plan but not others. I would keep the LED lighting and ask for fiber-optics and wifi as the technology will pay for itself. I would not have paid for the barricades and do not support the curfew.

 

Ring: I support a portion of it. As an advocate of community policing, I believe at least a part of that 40 million dollars can be better spent in other areas of the budget. The main component that I would keep is the crime cameras. I believe this is a technological benefit that can help police in researching a crime. The piece I would not keep is the closure of doors on Bourbon Street at 3AM. I don’t see any point in it. I do not think it will mitigate crime. I do think it will force additional enforcement that will take away from the overall security of the French Quarter.

 

Washington-Kendrick: No, I do not support the $40 million dollar Security plan in its entirety. While I would keep the surveillance cameras for major hot spots in the city and the 300 police cars. I would not "pedestrianize" the 200 to the 800 block of the French Quarters. I feel like we should give attention to other pressing needs in other neighborhoods of the city.

Maklansky: I have a record of making sure that our local business, particularly our music venues and cultural attractions, are protected. In consultation with the community, I will do whatever it takes to help our cultural community thrive, both now and for future generations.   Hardy: I believe that investments in our historic neighborhood bars, new music venues, and small cultural businesses will yield great returns in neighborhood jobs created, and overall economic impact from new commerce in our tourism economy. I will make sure the increase in the DBE loan pool and all other money available to local businesses has a greater positive impact on small business.   Ring: I will work to make all processes transparent and easy to work through the system. Currently permits are not as easy to get as they should be. Violations are taxing small businesses and clubs. I will work to work on the 311 system also to allow all of these entities to do things electronically if at all possible without having to venture to City Hall.   Washington-Kendrick: I think the most important way to support these entities is through top notch public safety. If we cannot be safe we cannot be anything. Also I would make sure their voices are always heard.

Maklansky: I have a record of making sure that our local business, particularly our music venues and cultural attractions, are protected. In consultation with the community, I will do whatever it takes to help our cultural community thrive, both now and for future generations.

 

Hardy: I believe that investments in our historic neighborhood bars, new music venues, and small cultural businesses will yield great returns in neighborhood jobs created, and overall economic impact from new commerce in our tourism economy. I will make sure the increase in the DBE loan pool and all other money available to local businesses has a greater positive impact on small business.

 

Ring: I will work to make all processes transparent and easy to work through the system. Currently permits are not as easy to get as they should be. Violations are taxing small businesses and clubs. I will work to work on the 311 system also to allow all of these entities to do things electronically if at all possible without having to venture to City Hall.

 

Washington-Kendrick: I think the most important way to support these entities is through top notch public safety. If we cannot be safe we cannot be anything. Also I would make sure their voices are always heard.

Maklansky: It is my understanding that the constitutionality of this curfew has been decided by a court of law which takes precedence.   Hardy: Yes   Ring: Yes I do. It has been proven unconstitutional numerous times at various levels. The ban attacks the very heart of the New Orleans music culture that tourists come here to see. In addition there are a variety of other much more annoying noises that one has to deal with at 8PM that are not being banned. This is an attack at street musicians, mostly black and young, that gentrifies the culture of the city.   Washington-Kendrick: Yes, I support the permanent removal of the 8p.m. street musician curfew.

Maklansky: It is my understanding that the constitutionality of this curfew has been decided by a court of law which takes precedence.

 

Hardy: Yes

 

Ring: Yes I do. It has been proven unconstitutional numerous times at various levels. The ban attacks the very heart of the New Orleans music culture that tourists come here to see. In addition there are a variety of other much more annoying noises that one has to deal with at 8PM that are not being banned. This is an attack at street musicians, mostly black and young, that gentrifies the culture of the city.

 

Washington-Kendrick: Yes, I support the permanent removal of the 8p.m. street musician curfew.

Maklansky: When I am on the Council, I will ask tourism and cultural industry leaders to come together to establish an advisory committee on culture and community to advise the City Council, very similar to the Environmental Advisory Committee I established while serving as the legislative director for Councilwoman Nadine Ramsey. Leaders from these communities should have a strong and effective dialogue with our City government to ensure that our culture and values are reflected in our governance.   Hardy: I will invite cultural communities to submit policy proposals and respond to existing policy. I believe that many previous proposals may have been disregarded or otherwise not supported due to politics of an inequitable system. Under my leadership ALL proposals and planning efforts will be transparent and inclusive.   Ring: I would love to see Cultural Economy have a committee at the City Council level. One could argue we already have a community development committee. I believe the attack on the culture of New Orleans by those that want to gentrify it is so fierce right now that we need someone in place to oversee cultural economy from these groups. My volunteer work with the Threadheads, a group of volunteers who first raised money in a not for profit record label then turned it into a 501c entity that recognizes and grants funds to a variety of culture bearers and culture restorers, has led me to believe that we cannot let our culture die in the hands of bearers who have spent their whole lives working within the traditions of New Orleans. We the council, as city leaders, need to show the importance of what culture can not only do for tourism but also what culture can do for sustaining a proud image of our city through masking, brass band and the like as well as the storied history of all of it.   Washington-Kendrick: Partnering with some of New Orleans' biggest figure would be a great civil asset to building communities. All music and art expression facets are aiming for the same goal; peace, togetherness/harmony and fun/party. Utilizing they outreach tactics would help to change narrative where they should be and creating a festive rubric on rights of the people.

Maklansky: When I am on the Council, I will ask tourism and cultural industry leaders to come together to establish an advisory committee on culture and community to advise the City Council, very similar to the Environmental Advisory Committee I established while serving as the legislative director for Councilwoman Nadine Ramsey. Leaders from these communities should have a strong and effective dialogue with our City government to ensure that our culture and values are reflected in our governance.

 

Hardy: I will invite cultural communities to submit policy proposals and respond to existing policy. I believe that many previous proposals may have been disregarded or otherwise not supported due to politics of an inequitable system. Under my leadership ALL proposals and planning efforts will be transparent and inclusive.

 

Ring: I would love to see Cultural Economy have a committee at the City Council level. One could argue we already have a community development committee. I believe the attack on the culture of New Orleans by those that want to gentrify it is so fierce right now that we need someone in place to oversee cultural economy from these groups. My volunteer work with the Threadheads, a group of volunteers who first raised money in a not for profit record label then turned it into a 501c entity that recognizes and grants funds to a variety of culture bearers and culture restorers, has led me to believe that we cannot let our culture die in the hands of bearers who have spent their whole lives working within the traditions of New Orleans. We the council, as city leaders, need to show the importance of what culture can not only do for tourism but also what culture can do for sustaining a proud image of our city through masking, brass band and the like as well as the storied history of all of it.

 

Washington-Kendrick: Partnering with some of New Orleans' biggest figure would be a great civil asset to building communities. All music and art expression facets are aiming for the same goal; peace, togetherness/harmony and fun/party. Utilizing they outreach tactics would help to change narrative where they should be and creating a festive rubric on rights of the people.

Maklansky: Cultural activities geared toward young audiences are great examples of initiatives that help keep kids engaged in productive and meaningful ways in the community. I will fully support community organizations such as Young Audiences, the Arts Council and Roots for Music. Furthermore, I support the creation of a Department of Youth Services and Families to coordinate the public and private services for our young people and families. This entity will work with the State-created Children and Community Planning Board to make sure we have coordinated, wrap-around services for youth from birth to adulthood, which can also serve as a partner for our youth cultural organizations.   Hardy: I believe every citizen should be able to walk to a cultural center where intergenerational, intercultural activity is provided on a weekly basis. I will seek funding to create an asset map of existing organizations, buildings, and funding that support cultural activity, and I will lead the effort to grow the resources available to our most vulnerable endangered cultures.   Ring: I believe in community schools. I am not a fan of the charter schools. I believe that we need to go back to community based school system and take corporations out of schools. By doing that we can do the one thing we can advocate for is a cultural awareness class. Cultural awareness class can teach the traditions and historical references to the students. Using Art, Music, Civics, Sports we can teach our students of the cultural importance of parading, playing music or making art. While many schools are removing it, we can champion it. To take a line from my friend, Shamarr Allen, we can have the students proudly proclaim “Music is my weapon”.   Washington-Kendrick: I would make sure that the organizations and non profits that engage in and teach cultural awareness through music and arts become meccas for our youth. I would make sure kids are engaged in these programs, especially those that are either in the system or on the radar for making bad decisions in the community or in school. These programs would act as corridors for the youth to be culturally aware, lifelong learners, productive citizens and it will create for them a positive and enriched quality of life because research has shown that: Musical training helps develop language and reasoning: Students who have early musical training will develop the areas of the brain related to language and reasoning. The left side of the brain is better developed with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds. Students have sense of achievement: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be a challenging, but achievable goal. Students who master even the smallest goal in music will be able to feel proud of their achievement. Student gain success in society: Music is the fabric of our society, and music can shape abilities and character. Students in band or orchestra are less likely to abuse substances over their lifetime. Musical education can greatly contribute to children’s intellectual development as well. Students are emotionally developed: Students of music can be more emotionally developed, with empathy towards other cultures They also tend to have higher self esteem and are better at coping with anxiety.   Students have better ACT/SAT scores: Students who have experience with music performance or appreciation score higher on the SAT. One report indicates 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on math for students in music appreciation courses. Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity: Introducing music in the early childhood years can help foster a positive attitude toward learning and curiosity. Artistic education develops the whole brain and develops a child’s imagination. Musical instruments can teach discipline: Kids who learn to play an instrument can learn a valuable lesson in discipline. They will have to set time aside to practice and rise to the challenge of learning with discipline to master playing their instrument. Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can prepare students for the 21st century workforce. The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow faster than others in the future. Students become responsible risk-takers: Performing a musical piece can bring fear and anxiety. Doing so teaches kids how to take risks and deal with fear, which will help them become successful and reach their potential. Students have better self-confidence: With encouragement from teachers and parents, students playing a musical instrument can build pride and confidence. Musical education is also likely to develop better communication for students.

Maklansky: Cultural activities geared toward young audiences are great examples of initiatives that help keep kids engaged in productive and meaningful ways in the community. I will fully support community organizations such as Young Audiences, the Arts Council and Roots for Music. Furthermore, I support the creation of a Department of Youth Services and Families to coordinate the public and private services for our young people and families. This entity will work with the State-created Children and Community Planning Board to make sure we have coordinated, wrap-around services for youth from birth to adulthood, which can also serve as a partner for our youth cultural organizations.

 

Hardy: I believe every citizen should be able to walk to a cultural center where intergenerational, intercultural activity is provided on a weekly basis. I will seek funding to create an asset map of existing organizations, buildings, and funding that support cultural activity, and I will lead the effort to grow the resources available to our most vulnerable endangered cultures.

 

Ring: I believe in community schools. I am not a fan of the charter schools. I believe that we need to go back to community based school system and take corporations out of schools. By doing that we can do the one thing we can advocate for is a cultural awareness class. Cultural awareness class can teach the traditions and historical references to the students. Using Art, Music, Civics, Sports we can teach our students of the cultural importance of parading, playing music or making art. While many schools are removing it, we can champion it. To take a line from my friend, Shamarr Allen, we can have the students proudly proclaim “Music is my weapon”.

 

Washington-Kendrick: I would make sure that the organizations and non profits that engage in and teach cultural awareness through music and arts become meccas for our youth. I would make sure kids are engaged in these programs, especially those that are either in the system or on the radar for making bad decisions in the community or in school. These programs would act as corridors for the youth to be culturally aware, lifelong learners, productive citizens and it will create for them a positive and enriched quality of life because research has shown that:

Musical training helps develop language and reasoning: Students who have early musical training will develop the areas of the brain related to language and reasoning. The left side of the brain is better developed with music, and songs can help imprint information on young minds.

Students have sense of achievement: Learning to play pieces of music on a new instrument can be a challenging, but achievable goal. Students who master even the smallest goal in music will be able to feel proud of their achievement.

Student gain success in society: Music is the fabric of our society, and music can shape abilities and character. Students in band or orchestra are less likely to abuse substances over their lifetime. Musical education can greatly contribute to children’s intellectual development as well.

Students are emotionally developed: Students of music can be more emotionally developed, with empathy towards other cultures They also tend to have higher self esteem and are better at coping with anxiety.
 

Students have better ACT/SAT scores: Students who have experience with music performance or appreciation score higher on the SAT. One report indicates 63 points higher on verbal and 44 points higher on math for students in music appreciation courses.

Music builds imagination and intellectual curiosity: Introducing music in the early childhood years can help foster a positive attitude toward learning and curiosity. Artistic education develops the whole brain and develops a child’s imagination.

Musical instruments can teach discipline: Kids who learn to play an instrument can learn a valuable lesson in discipline. They will have to set time aside to practice and rise to the challenge of learning with discipline to master playing their instrument.

Preparation for the creative economy: Investing in creative education can prepare students for the 21st century workforce. The new economy has created more artistic careers, and these jobs may grow faster than others in the future.

Students become responsible risk-takers: Performing a musical piece can bring fear and anxiety. Doing so teaches kids how to take risks and deal with fear, which will help them become successful and reach their potential.

Students have better self-confidence: With encouragement from teachers and parents, students playing a musical instrument can build pride and confidence. Musical education is also likely to develop better communication for students.

Maklansky: I highly encourage organizations such as Roots for Music to engage with the community both inside and outside of school. Furthermore, I hope to see increased funding for the arts and cultural studies in our school systems. Our culture is at the core of what makes us all New Orleanians.   Hardy: I will lead the effort to regain our neighborhood schools and make them available to the surrounding communities for after school and weekend activities. Also, our senior centers should become more intergenerational as our elders live healthier longer lives when they are surrounded by positive youth and our youth live more prosperous lives when they are mentored by elders.   Ring: Much what I said above is what we can do to pass that  cultural importance along. In addition, by working in a community based school system we can teach to the subject and not be handcuffed by testing. We can require the student take one of a number of classes (art, music, music history, various classes on cultural aspects) to show the educational importance of the culture of New Orleans.   Washington-Kendrick: We can invest in the culture by developing resources and more facilities that would impact our youth. Some of New Orleans' brass band leaders started an organization called "Roots of Music" that's dedication to the mission to teach young minds the culture of being a musician in New Orleans.

Maklansky: I highly encourage organizations such as Roots for Music to engage with the community both inside and outside of school. Furthermore, I hope to see increased funding for the arts and cultural studies in our school systems. Our culture is at the core of what makes us all New Orleanians.

 

Hardy: I will lead the effort to regain our neighborhood schools and make them available to the surrounding communities for after school and weekend activities. Also, our senior centers should become more intergenerational as our elders live healthier longer lives when they are surrounded by positive youth and our youth live more prosperous lives when they are mentored by elders.

 

Ring: Much what I said above is what we can do to pass that  cultural importance along. In addition, by working in a community based school system we can teach to the subject and not be handcuffed by testing. We can require the student take one of a number of classes (art, music, music history, various classes on cultural aspects) to show the educational importance of the culture of New Orleans.

 

Washington-Kendrick: We can invest in the culture by developing resources and more facilities that would impact our youth. Some of New Orleans' brass band leaders started an organization called "Roots of Music" that's dedication to the mission to teach young minds the culture of being a musician in New Orleans.

Maklansky: Yes   Hardy: Yes   Ring: Yes I do. I would go as far as offering in any area that a club does not have viable access to load and unload. Frenchmen and Bourbon are big areas but parts of Oak and Freret maybe can use it as well.   Washington-Kendrick: Yes, some of our musicians are older and they equipment can be a bit heavy. We want to show the character that we care, that development had our culture in mind... without them we have no New Orleans.

Maklansky: Yes

 

Hardy: Yes

 

Ring: Yes I do. I would go as far as offering in any area that a club does not have viable access to load and unload. Frenchmen and Bourbon are big areas but parts of Oak and Freret maybe can use it as well.

 

Washington-Kendrick: Yes, some of our musicians are older and they equipment can be a bit heavy. We want to show the character that we care, that development had our culture in mind... without them we have no New Orleans.